Bright Old Things for Selfridges

BOT_6 blue

William Forbes Hamilton used to demonstrate magic tricks in the Toy Department at Selfridges in the 1950s before turning into a horror movie villain in such films as ‘Doctor Blood’s Coffin’. Now he’s a painter and back at Selfridges – at least back in a profile from their new publication, Bright Old Things, which celebrates the discovery of creative outlets later in life.

William is one of fourteen Bright Old Things featured in the classic tabloid newspaper printed by Selfridges earlier this year (there’s also an architect turned topiarist and product designer turned sci fi blogger).

It’s a lovely and uplifting project, featuring photography and illustrated interviews from Todd Selby. Here’s what Selfridges has to say:

Since 2011 Selfridges’ Bright Young Things has championed young creative talent, but this year the tables turned.

BOT_4

Bright Old Things is Selfridges’ celebration of the retirement renaissance. Those inspirational individuals who have created a new vocation for themselves in later life. The men and women who show that creativity is ageless.

BOT_3_Turquoise

To support this store-wide scheme, and to tell the stories of the older creatives featured in Selfridges’ world-famous windows, the team chose to work with us to create a Bright Old Things newspaper featuring amazing photography by renowned photographer, author and illustrator Todd Selby alongside insightful interviews with each of the 14 Bright Old Things.

BOT_2 pink

From ‘70s fashion editor-turned-artist Molly Parkin to legendary punk hero Bruno Wizard, each interview gives an inspirational insight into the wide possibilities that are open to us in our later years.

You can learn more about all of the Bright Old Things and follow #BrightOldThings for updates.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: art, case studies, classic tabloid, photography

Design Is Everything: Paul Rand at MCNY

PaulRand

Should you find yourself in New York in the next few months, there’s a really lovely collection of Paul Rand’s work on display at the Museum of the City of New York until 19 July. Rand started out designing clever graphics for newspapers and magazines in the 1930’s – as the New York Times puts it, he ‘started his career as a 20-year-old wunderkind and never stopped being brilliant.’ This small but dense exhibition explores his brilliance in everything from book covers to light bulb packaging. Very recommended!

P1110186

P1110191

P1110201

P1110194

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: art, design, field trip, illustration, museum

The Things My Mothers Taught Me

clio_meldon2

Mother’s Day is next month and we’ve been thinking about mum-themed newspapers. A newspaper makes a lovely keepsake – a slightly more grown up version of the fingerprint cards we used to bring home from school. But unlike a card, it’s something that can be shared with family and friends, too.

The Things My Mothers Taught Me is a lovely example. Clio Meldon took portraits of some influential women in her life (mums and otherwise) and asked them: ‘What is the most important thing you’ve ever learned?’ The responses she received were ‘beautiful, funny, intelligent, and inspiring.’ She collected them all in a digital tabloid and printed a short run of 20 copies.

clio_meldon3

She gave the newspapers to friends and family, and included the project in an end of year exhibition for her college degree. You can find The Things My Mothers Taught Me in The Newsagent and also view the project on ISSUU. Thank you for printing with us!

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: case studies, digital tabloid, holidays, Newsagent, students

Winter Wonderland now available at Good Press

Winterwonderland

Last year we wrote about Winter Wonderland, a publication of peaceful wintry landscapes we printed for Takeshi Suga. We’re pleased to say that you can now find Winter Wonderland amidst all sorts of other lovely zines at Good Press in Glasgow.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: art, classic tabloid, photography

Linzie Hunter’s Hand-Lettered Resolutions

unnamed

New Year’s resolutions are fleeting things. So we’re grateful to Linzie Hunter for putting such a delightful collection of them on paper, immortalised in digital tabloid form. Linzie is a Scottish-born illustrator based in London, and her work can be found everywhere from the The Wall Street Journal to the covers of a toppling stack of books published by the likes of Scholastic and Penguin.

Earlier this year Linzie called upon her social media following for New Year’s resolutions, which she then illustrated, one resolution a day, throughout January. By the end of the month she had a wonderful series of hand-lettered good intentions.

6-7

Linzie tells us why she decided to publish her illustrations in a newspaper:

At the end of January, I felt it would be nice to see all the images printed together in one small publication, rather than just being displayed online or printed as individual postcards. I had wanted print my own newspaper for a while so this seemed like a great opportunity and a nice way to wrap up the project.

linziehunter2

A large part of my commercial work is digital so I spend a lot of time staring at a computer screen. It’s great to be able to publish your work online immediately for all to see, but nothing quite compares to seeing your work in print and on paper. Traditional print-making is a lovely escape when I have the time. And it’s also nice to be able to print big on newsprint!

4-5

I managed to squeeze in some Gocco printing and have produced some starburst-shaped postcards to send with each newspaper.

linzie-gocco-postcards

Lizzie is sending her newspaper to friends, art directors, and existing clients. If you’re keen to get a copy for yourself, get in touch with Linzie through her website, where you can also see the full set of illustrated resolutions. Thanks for printing with us!

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid, illustration

Tell us what you think about ARTHR!

unnamed

We asked for feedback about ARTHR in our last newsletter and were happy to receive some helpful responses. We’re going to repeat ourselves here for those who don’t subscribe to our (informative and very uninvasive…*cough*) newsletter:

We’re redeveloping our online layout tool ARTHR and want to hear your suggestions about how we can make it easier to use. We love hearing about publications that ARTHR has helped produce, like the beautiful paper Tif Hunter made for his grandparents’ 65th wedding anniversary (pictured above). If you’ve created a paper with ARTHR, tell us what you think at arthrfeedback@newspaperclub.com. We’d love to hear from you!

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: ARTHR

Pinning printing museums

Photo from Maraid Design

 Photo from Maraid Design

We’ve created a new board on Pinterest to collect museums dedicated to print history, like the wonderful Robert Smail’s Printing Works in Innerleithen. Let us know if there’s a print museum we’ve missed, we love to hear about them.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: museum, Newspaper Stories, print's not dead

The Chimpington Post

chimpington1

It may seem incongruous for a company built around email to produce a newspaper to communicate with students — but MailChimp is known to do things a bit differently.

The cover of their career fair handout, The Chimpington Post, nods to the irony with a cover headline proclaiming ‘Email Still Not Dead!’ Traditional newspaper fixtures (crossword, classified ads) are used to playful effect in a distinctly digital age publication, complete with 80’s synthpop colour palette.

chimpington-post-ads

The Chimpington Post is all about what makes working at MailChimp special, which is made clear from the start with a newspaper that stands out amongst glossy stock photo pamphlets. It looks really, really brilliant.

The project was led by Jane Song, who published an insightful account of the design process on MailChimp’s Design Lab blog:

When I was tasked with designing MailChimp’s collateral to hand out at career fairs, I really took it to heart. At MailChimp, we’re not only incredibly proud of what we do, but we also have a lot of fun doing it—and it was important to communicate that to any students who moseyed on over to our booth.

tumblr_nd3fry7nPg1ri8rtfo4_1280

Luckily, our art director, David, was on the same page. No glossy, uninspired pamphlets would come from us. He had a better idea: We would create an entire newspaper ‘bout that MailChimp life. And we would make it awesome.

chimpington-post-slide-3

Once all the stories were in and I’d made the last tweaks to the design, we used Newspaper Club to print 2,000 copies of The Chimpington Post. We scattered some around the office, and it brings me so much joy to see visitors in our waiting area reaching for the paper after they’ve looked at every app on their phones. I’ve even seen some of my coworkers (who, duh, already work here) flipping through the pages, too.

tumblr_nd3fry7nPg1ri8rtfo5_1280

Most of the newspapers, though, went to our HR team. At career fairs, our recruiters talk as much as they can about MailChimp in the few precious minutes they have with students. They leave the rest up to The Chimpington Post, confident that whatever they couldn’t fit into the conversation, we’ve got it covered.

You can read Jane’s full post over at Mailchimp. Thanks for printing such a standout newspaper with us!

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: case studies, design, Newspaper Stories

Happy Easter!

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: holidays

Making eggs out of newsprint

Papermacheeggs

We’re closed now for the Easter holiday and will be back on 7 April. If you’re itching to get your hands grubby with newsprint this weekend, may we suggest this handy tutorial on making eggs out of newspaper?

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: holidays, newspaper crafts

← Newer Posts | Older Posts →