CSM Fashion & Textiles Foundation Show 2015

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The Central Saint Martins Foundation Show 2015 opened today in London. The annual Foundation Show showcases work from students across Foundation Art and Design diploma programmes. It’s the third year we’ve printed a newspaper for the Fashion & Textiles exhibition, and this time it’s a traditional mini bursting with colour and designed by creative agency StudioThomson. (You can see a previous Central Saint Martins paper on their website.)

The newspaper features highlights of student work produced for the show, including some terrifically fun garments from a collaborative collection inspired by the Minions. (The Minions!) Genius.

Here’s the paper looking smashing in situ:

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The run of 2000 copies will be given out for free at the Foundation Show, which is on frrom Thursday 14th – Saturday 16th May at 1 Granary Square, Kings Cross, London N1C 4AA. (More details on the CSM website.)

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Design by StudioThomson.
Mens and Textiles photography by Jo Simpson and Gail Evans.
Womens photography by Tim Meara.

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Filed under: case studies, design, fashion, students, traditional mini

Paper of the Month: Monogamy

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Our Paper of the Month for April is Monogamyfrom University of Hertfordshire illustration student Gemma Louise. We fell in love with her digital tabloid newspaper, which was inspired by the true relationship between two inseparable greylag geese (Gemma saw the story in a documentary on animal behavior and crafted a university project around it.)

With wonderfully textured and expressive illustrations, Monogamy is truly beautiful storytelling – a publication we’d happily settle down with for a lifetime.

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About Paper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one paper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a paper with us, share your paper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

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Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid, illustration, Paper of the Month, students

The Things My Mothers Taught Me

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Mother’s Day is next month and we’ve been thinking about mum-themed newspapers. A newspaper makes a lovely keepsake – a slightly more grown up version of the fingerprint cards we used to bring home from school. But unlike a card, it’s something that can be shared with family and friends, too.

The Things My Mothers Taught Me is a lovely example. Clio Meldon took portraits of some influential women in her life (mums and otherwise) and asked them: ‘What is the most important thing you’ve ever learned?’ The responses she received were ‘beautiful, funny, intelligent, and inspiring.’ She collected them all in a digital tabloid and printed a short run of 20 copies.

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She gave the newspapers to friends and family, and included the project in an end of year exhibition for her college degree. You can find The Things My Mothers Taught Me in The Newsagent and also view the project on ISSUU. Thank you for printing with us!

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Filed under: case studies, digital tabloid, holidays, Newsagent, students

A Collection

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Miriam Davies is a printmaker studying Fine Art at the Cardiff School of Art and Design. She keeps a beautiful online journal where she documents her visits to the beach at Southerndown and the wonderful objects and textures she finds there. She printed A Collection with us, a digital tabloid newspaper of some cherished (and mysterious) old photographs. We asked her to share the story behind her newspaper:

A Collection was created in response to a project brief where I had to take found objects and create a narrative. Although the brief was new, the project had in fact started two years previously. I started collecting photographs out of an unusual moral obligation I felt towards protecting them. Purchased at various markets across the UK, once I had found them it became very difficult to leave them behind.

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A Collection consists of 77 images; I do not know any of the people in the photographs nor where they originate. Any information I have gathered lies within the photographs themselves. As delicate, personal items I often wonder how these images were left behind and what strange fate led them into my possession.

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My objective in A Collection was to question the value of a photograph, the stories behind them and the private moments shared. Although I purchased the photographs they still do not belong to me. Therefore I do not have the authority to display them. I thought by creating a newspaper they could be shared in a more private, one-to-one viewing rather than posted on the internet or displayed on a wall.

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The photographs were later used to create a body of work, exploring the variety of ways in which you can adjust and display a photograph while protecting the identity of the people.

You can find more of Miriam’s work on her website. Thank you for printing your lovely project with us!

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Filed under: case studies, digital tabloid, students

21st Century Fortunes

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Manjit Thapp is a student studying illustration in London and this is her delightful newspaper comic. It’s called 21st Century Fortunes and was created in response to a brief on the theme of ‘conversation.’ It’s a great interaction between a cunning psychic and her beguiled client.

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It’s a clever and beautifully drawn story and you can read the whole thing on Cargo Collective.

 

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Manjit posts her illustrations and works in progress on her blog A Thousand Daisies and it’s well worth a visit. Thanks for printing with us!

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Filed under: digital tabloid, illustration, students

Paper of the Month: Medea/Worn

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We recently printed our 6 millionth (!) newspaper but we’re still constantly being surprised by new and imaginative uses for newsprint. Our Paper of the Month for September is a perfect example: Medea/Worn is a script for an original play printed in the style of a 1950s dress pattern. It’s a beautiful piece of work, printed as two separate digital tabloids that are folded together. The paper was designed by writer and illustrator Emily Juniper, who was just nominated for Best New Playwright in the Off West End awards. We asked Emily to tell us more about project:

Medea/Worn is a limited edition, illustrated script, designed to look and feel like a 1950s dress pattern.  I explored the narrative of Medea’s bloody decision by giving voice to her wedding gown. I wanted to give voice to her wedding gown, as it turned from innocent dress to murder weapon. I wanted this transition to act as a vehicle for Medea to explore her justification and anguish as she considers the consequences of her horrific notion, that she must slay her own children in order to punish Jason completely for his treachery.

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I hand-made pocket-gusset envelopes, risograph printed by Ditto Press, which you must tear open to discover the folded sheets of newsprint within.  The quality of paper was so important to me, and the Newspaper Club allowed me to produce pages that really look and feel like the real thing.

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I’m currently studying for an MA in Illustration and Authorial Practice at Falmouth University.  When I was commissioned by The Faction Theatre Company to write a version of Medea, I felt it was a great project to combine with my exploration of illustration.

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I wanted to create a space for the play text that would utilise the performative quality of paper and also exploit the intimate encounter of the book as an object.

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As the new character in Medea was going to be her gown, I chose to set my poetic text against the schematic drawings of a dress pattern.  I loved the tension between the dense words and economical drawings.

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I sourced vintage patterns and created a grid for my words.  As Medea begins to lose her mind, the formal structures of the pattern disintegrate and the final page, when she has made the decision to kill her children, is blank.

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My hope is that the mathematical lines and shapes provide the same canvas for the imagination as is employed when unpicking metaphors or similes in prose.  Which is why this seemingly disparate connection between poetry and schematic drawings can be made.  The drawn lines in the pattern are compared to the folds and falling of fabric, but one is ink on a page and one is a three dimensional object. The conjuring act involved in this might be compared to the way Shakespeare describes winter branches as Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. The writer asks the reader to perform an act of poetic creation. This is what an illustrator is doing with ink lines on the page.  It is not the same thing as the object, yet it invokes it.

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Congratulations Emily, and thank you for sharing your brilliant project with us!

About Paper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one paper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a paper with us, share your paper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

 

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Filed under: case studies, illustration, Newsagent, Paper of the Month, students, theatre

How to Run a School Newspaper Project: Part 3

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Ian Vince is a writer and father who helped his daughter’s primary school class make a newspaper. He’s written about the process and today we have the final instalment of his guest blog posts. (You can catch up on Part 1 and Part 2 if you missed them.)

After my second session of writing workshops with Key Stage 2 pupils, a problem started to become apparent with the whole idea. The children – all between 8 and 11 years old – had been charged with writing all the copy for an 8-page tabloid newspaper and while a lot of progress had been made, there were huge holes in the project. For one thing, there simply wasn’t the volume of material that was needed. Things had to change.

Fortunately, as the weeks passed, it became clear that the challenges that remained contained within them the seeds of their own solution. While not every child had contributed something that would fit within the paper, it was decided to get them to try a different kind of writing that could exist in a space dedicated to it. The teacher was asked if she could get the children to contribute two or three bite-sized amazing facts for every planet in the solar system. These would be compiled into an infographic for the centre spread – a pull-out poster, in effect. The copy that came back was excellent, focussed copy, everyone had contributed something and two pages could be laid out in a funky, interesting way.

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Copy started coming in from another class in the school. Key Stage 1 pupils supplied me with recounts – essentially newspaper reports – of the event that kicked off the workshop, the staged ‘landing’ of a small, home-made ‘time machine’ in the school field. These were all essentially the same story, with individual elaborations written of different details along the way. The trick was to get as many of these stories in print as possible, so it was run as a newspaper story, complete with captioned picture and screamer headline, but sub-divided into a kind of eye-witness vox-pops-in-print, enabling everyone to have a shout.

In the end, all but the very youngest children had a piece in their own school newspaper and every child could take a copy home. The school gained not only a set of interesting challenges that could drive pupil engagement and a stack of left-over newspapers to show prospective parents, but a PR opportunity in the local newspaper. The writer, meanwhile, found new ways of working, a thoroughly fulfilling and worthwhile project and inspiration from some of the most imaginative minds on the planet.

What To Do Next

Get in touch with a writer, journalist or editor. In particular, find out if there is one among the mums and dads or on the governing body. You don’t even need to find a writer with design experience as Newspaper Club’s online ARTHR layout tool gives you everything you need to get the children’s words and pictures into print.

Thanks very much to Ian Vince for sharing his experience. If you’re thinking about creating a newspaper for your school, read about how it works and have a look through The Newsagent for some design inspiration. You can also get in touch with us at support@newspaperclub.com if you have any questions about the process.

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Filed under: ARTHR, case studies, guest blog, Newspaper Stories, students

How to Run a School Newspaper Project: Part 2

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Yesterday we introduced Ian Vince, who organised a workshop at his daughter’s primary school to produce a newspaper. Today we have the second of Ian’s three guest blog posts documenting his experience putting together The Longford Examiner with the students.

In the first part of this series of three blog posts, I told you about how I came to be leading a children’s writing workshop for Key Stage 2 pupils at my daughter’s primary school – workshops that I hoped would help them produce all the words required for an 8-page tabloid newspaper.

That’s quite a tall order for a class of a dozen or so children aged between 8 and 11 of varying ability, especially when it is important for every pupil to contribute something – no matter how minor – to the finished paper.

If you’re a teacher reading this, you’ll know all about the educational targets you are charged with getting your class to meet. If, like me, you are not a teacher then remember that it’s not your job to teach – you are there to provide light and shade, a different viewpoint and perspective that will give the teacher new opportunities to do their job. Non-teachers who haven’t observed just what happens in a modern classroom will also be surprised at how dynamic teaching has become, with attention switching from whiteboard, to pupil interaction, to active teaching – a continual rolling back-and-forth that keeps energy and attention at an optimum level for learning.

Inserting a writer into this mix and taking the lesson two-handed with the class teacher keeps everything on the move, but beware of talking too much as you don’t want the novelty to wear off.

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Lessons, which stretched across three mornings, started with a short whiteboard presentation of science fiction graphics – book covers, NASA conceptual artwork – and imagination-firing facts. We talked about the constellation Orion and the various supernovae that have occurred in it over millions of years and looked at the star Betelgeuse which will probably be the next to go ker-blooey – tomorrow, next week or in a thousand years’ time. After filling their heads with the explosions of distant stars, it seemed like a good time to set the brief for them to write speculative fiction – what would life be like in 1000 years from now?

It turned out that the newspaper itself was inspiring (never under-estimate the promise of getting your name in print) even among the digitally-literate under-11s. Having shown pupils a Newspaper Club sample at the outset, many of them decided that they wanted to copy its various elements. All of a sudden, ads, puzzles, news stories, captions and the like were all mooted and the project took on a life of its own. This proved to be a useful disruption of the original plan to publish a paper full of short stories and poems, as the medium of long-form creative writing wasn’t suited to all.

At last, I started to be able to leave school with suitable material, but I was aware that there were gaping holes developing and it would take some determined steering to get the paper back on course.

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Filed under: case studies, guest blog, Newspaper Stories, students

How to Run a School Newspaper Project: Part 1

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According to today’s Google doodle it’s officially the end of summer and it’s back to school for many. We thought now would be a good time to show off a brilliant newspaper project from Longford Primary School in Salisbury. Countryfile columnist Ian Vince put together The Longford Examiner with his daughter’s primary class and has written a series of guest blog posts about the process. This is first of three instalments that will be posted over the next week. And now here’s Ian:

It started with a simple idea – a newspaper project for my daughter’s primary school, a project that could be somehow connected to activities during Book Week, to link writing and reading together and make it fun. It was also designed as a way of encouraging reluctant writers – especially in Key Stage 2, the top three years of school – to develop the writing skills that would stand them in good stead as they moved towards secondary school.

If all that sounds like a tall order, that’s only because the outcomes of simple ideas can be amazing. It’s easy to make newspaper projects educationally sound, but if a project has a few disruptive elements to it, children – who love the suspension of the normal order of things – truly engage in the learning, which was the aim all along.

To achieve that, a science fiction theme was set and work began on the construction of a few props to kick off the fun with – details below. Newspaper publication was the reward that would spur pupils on in their writing, but a subject, a setting and inspiration was needed to get them to start without even realising it.

In short, a simple, convincing crash scene was mocked up in the school playing field and children were breathlessly summoned to view the wreckage as morning assembly came to an end. CDs were ‘discovered’ on the machine, one for each class and each with its own message from ‘Fiona’, a time-travelling, living computer from the year 3014. Fiona set the pupils their tasks, a speculative fiction challenge to write about what they think life will be like in the future. One class is given a more conventional newspaper brief, to report on the whole Fiona story.

The next stage was how to turn this craziness into an opportunity for the class teacher. A subject we will return to in the next instalment.

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Props and materials

How far you go with your set-up is entirely up to you, but in this case, a few cheap DIY theatre props went a long way to providing a bit of back-story and ensuring that the situation was unusual enough to catch and fire the pupils’ imaginations:

  • Time machine
    Made from an odd-shaped box covered in silver foil, bits of dead circuit board from redundant TV remotes and some steam-punk ducting.
  • Spare mobile phone
    A siren and warning klaxon were provided by a mobile phone, rigged up to battery-powered speakers with a custom ringtone knocked up in a software sound editor and triggered by discretely ringing the phone.
  • Christmas lights
    Two sets of flashing LED lights were installed to create a pleasing pulsing light display
  • Smoke in a can
    An aerosol of smoke in a can, available from Maplin, was buried up to its nozzle next to the wreck in a way that enabled it to be operated with a foot.
  • CDs of messages from the future
    Fiona’s script was recorded as it was read aloud by computer screen-reading software. The sound file was then manipulated in Audacity, a free PC/Mac sound editor.

In the next instalment Ian will talk about organising his class of students and generating content for their newspaper. Tune in tomorrow!

Posted by Sarah | Comments (2)

Filed under: case studies, guest blog, Newspaper Stories, students

Paper of the Month: Everything for Breakfast

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Our Paper of the Month for July is Everything for Breakfast from Sheffield-based illustrator David Hill. Set in a brilliantly drawn universe, the 20-page digital tabloid starts off with an invitation to a birthday breakfast on a lighthouse. The story follows an adventurer in a fabulous jumper, making her way across the world one breakfast at a time — it’s our kind of comic. Just look at that bedroom!

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Unfortunately we can’t jump into the pages, but David was happy to tell us a bit more about his comic:

Everything for Breakfast is the result of my final university project, where I wanted to create something for children to interact with, to read through, and to implicitly receive the message of the importance of acceptance and tolerance amongst different cultures.

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I use my child protagonists – Scottish Explorer Aggie and Ghanaian food lover Kofi – to get the message across in their own unique way. In issue one, Aggie encounters the Tunnel Dudes, a grumpy set of postmen, who become both help and hindrances throughout. They reluctantly help her on her way south towards the Congo jungle so she can find the best present for Kofi’s birthday, while eating all the breakfast she can before setting off again.

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Children’s comics have been around for many years, though a gap seems apparent in educational comics for kids who are becoming more socially independent as they move from primary to secondary school. With this project I was hoping to bridge that gap with my contribution.

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I see the comic being read by kids in schools during the morning breakfast routine, or at break time, so I wanted the comic to be a larger format than the usual issued comic of today, and saw that our University’s graduation brochure was being printed through Newspaper Club. I’ve been aware of the company for a while so this was the perfect excuse to see what my work looks like as a newspaper. The results are great, and I didn’t expect the company to be so personal with the project! And now I know how to make Issue 2 even better.

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This is just the first of a planned four installments, and we can’t wait for the next issue. Thanks for printing with us, David!

About Paper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one paper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a paper with us, share your paper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

 

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off

Filed under: art, case studies, illustration, Newsagent, Newspaper Stories, Paper of the Month, students

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