Designing a Wedding Newspaper

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We’ve seen lots of wedding papers go through our presses lately. Invitations, orders of service, keepsakes for guests– all sorts. We’ve been meaning to write something about making a wedding paper and then we got a message from designer Adam Morris, who put together a digital tabloid newspaper when he got married earlier this year. He’s written an excellent blog post about creating a wedding newspaper, sharing all the thoughtful details that went into his design process. It sums up everything we would want to say, and has some lovely photos to boot. It’s a beautiful memento and great starting point for anyone thinking of making a newspaper for their wedding. Adam says:

We loved putting the newspaper together. It was a lot of effort, and it took a fair while to mastermind. But it was great to re-live our day and share the photos in this unique way with all of our guests. One of them even said it was the best thing they had received in the mail for years!

We really recommend hopping over to Adam’s blog to read the the whole thing. We love reading the stories behind well made papers, and this was a really nice thing to find in our inbox. Thank you for sharing your story with us!

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Filed under: case studies, guest blog, Newspaper Stories, weddings

Face Me

9Poppy Skelley is an illustrator who recently finished her final year at Cambridge School of Art. She put together a digital tabloid newspaper called FACE ME, a fine collection of faces drawn over the course of her studies. Her lovely black-and-white drawings look great in newsprint, and we asked her to tell us a bit about her work:

FACE ME is a self-initiated project based on the topic of the face. I was researching into masks, faces and sculptures for a project that I was doing at university where I intended to create my own 3D busts out of clay. I had a lot of sketches and illustrations from museums and books that I produced throughout my project and I wanted to display them in some way.

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Printing through Newspaper Club was the ideal way to show my collection of illustrations and I found the online layout tool ARTHR really useful for playing around with page layout and page order.

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This paper also includes sketches made at home of my friends, self-portraits and faces drawn from my imagination. I am continuously drawing people and faces and it seems to be something that captures my interest and inspires me.

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The illustrations are produced using black and white gouache paints, pencils and pens.  I usually work with a lot of colour and texture in my illustrations, so it was a challenge to put together something that was black and white. It proved to be refreshing to work in a different way to what I am used to and I am very happy with the printed result.

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You can buy prints of Poppy’s drawings, including sketches from FACE ME, in her online shop. She keeps a very lovely illustration blog, too. Thanks for printing with us, Poppy!

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Filed under: art, ARTHR, case studies, illustration, Newspaper Stories

How to Run a School Newspaper Project: Part 3

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Ian Vince is a writer and father who helped his daughter’s primary school class make a newspaper. He’s written about the process and today we have the final instalment of his guest blog posts. (You can catch up on Part 1 and Part 2 if you missed them.)

After my second session of writing workshops with Key Stage 2 pupils, a problem started to become apparent with the whole idea. The children – all between 8 and 11 years old – had been charged with writing all the copy for an 8-page tabloid newspaper and while a lot of progress had been made, there were huge holes in the project. For one thing, there simply wasn’t the volume of material that was needed. Things had to change.

Fortunately, as the weeks passed, it became clear that the challenges that remained contained within them the seeds of their own solution. While not every child had contributed something that would fit within the paper, it was decided to get them to try a different kind of writing that could exist in a space dedicated to it. The teacher was asked if she could get the children to contribute two or three bite-sized amazing facts for every planet in the solar system. These would be compiled into an infographic for the centre spread – a pull-out poster, in effect. The copy that came back was excellent, focussed copy, everyone had contributed something and two pages could be laid out in a funky, interesting way.

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Copy started coming in from another class in the school. Key Stage 1 pupils supplied me with recounts – essentially newspaper reports – of the event that kicked off the workshop, the staged ‘landing’ of a small, home-made ‘time machine’ in the school field. These were all essentially the same story, with individual elaborations written of different details along the way. The trick was to get as many of these stories in print as possible, so it was run as a newspaper story, complete with captioned picture and screamer headline, but sub-divided into a kind of eye-witness vox-pops-in-print, enabling everyone to have a shout.

In the end, all but the very youngest children had a piece in their own school newspaper and every child could take a copy home. The school gained not only a set of interesting challenges that could drive pupil engagement and a stack of left-over newspapers to show prospective parents, but a PR opportunity in the local newspaper. The writer, meanwhile, found new ways of working, a thoroughly fulfilling and worthwhile project and inspiration from some of the most imaginative minds on the planet.

What To Do Next

Get in touch with a writer, journalist or editor. In particular, find out if there is one among the mums and dads or on the governing body. You don’t even need to find a writer with design experience as Newspaper Club’s online ARTHR layout tool gives you everything you need to get the children’s words and pictures into print.

Thanks very much to Ian Vince for sharing his experience. If you’re thinking about creating a newspaper for your school, read about how it works and have a look through The Newsagent for some design inspiration. You can also get in touch with us at support@newspaperclub.com if you have any questions about the process.

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Filed under: ARTHR, case studies, guest blog, Newspaper Stories, students

How to Run a School Newspaper Project: Part 2

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Yesterday we introduced Ian Vince, who organised a workshop at his daughter’s primary school to produce a newspaper. Today we have the second of Ian’s three guest blog posts documenting his experience putting together The Longford Examiner with the students.

In the first part of this series of three blog posts, I told you about how I came to be leading a children’s writing workshop for Key Stage 2 pupils at my daughter’s primary school – workshops that I hoped would help them produce all the words required for an 8-page tabloid newspaper.

That’s quite a tall order for a class of a dozen or so children aged between 8 and 11 of varying ability, especially when it is important for every pupil to contribute something – no matter how minor – to the finished paper.

If you’re a teacher reading this, you’ll know all about the educational targets you are charged with getting your class to meet. If, like me, you are not a teacher then remember that it’s not your job to teach – you are there to provide light and shade, a different viewpoint and perspective that will give the teacher new opportunities to do their job. Non-teachers who haven’t observed just what happens in a modern classroom will also be surprised at how dynamic teaching has become, with attention switching from whiteboard, to pupil interaction, to active teaching – a continual rolling back-and-forth that keeps energy and attention at an optimum level for learning.

Inserting a writer into this mix and taking the lesson two-handed with the class teacher keeps everything on the move, but beware of talking too much as you don’t want the novelty to wear off.

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Lessons, which stretched across three mornings, started with a short whiteboard presentation of science fiction graphics – book covers, NASA conceptual artwork – and imagination-firing facts. We talked about the constellation Orion and the various supernovae that have occurred in it over millions of years and looked at the star Betelgeuse which will probably be the next to go ker-blooey – tomorrow, next week or in a thousand years’ time. After filling their heads with the explosions of distant stars, it seemed like a good time to set the brief for them to write speculative fiction – what would life be like in 1000 years from now?

It turned out that the newspaper itself was inspiring (never under-estimate the promise of getting your name in print) even among the digitally-literate under-11s. Having shown pupils a Newspaper Club sample at the outset, many of them decided that they wanted to copy its various elements. All of a sudden, ads, puzzles, news stories, captions and the like were all mooted and the project took on a life of its own. This proved to be a useful disruption of the original plan to publish a paper full of short stories and poems, as the medium of long-form creative writing wasn’t suited to all.

At last, I started to be able to leave school with suitable material, but I was aware that there were gaping holes developing and it would take some determined steering to get the paper back on course.

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Filed under: case studies, guest blog, Newspaper Stories, students

How to Run a School Newspaper Project: Part 1

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According to today’s Google doodle it’s officially the end of summer and it’s back to school for many. We thought now would be a good time to show off a brilliant newspaper project from Longford Primary School in Salisbury. Countryfile columnist Ian Vince put together The Longford Examiner with his daughter’s primary class and has written a series of guest blog posts about the process. This is first of three instalments that will be posted over the next week. And now here’s Ian:

It started with a simple idea – a newspaper project for my daughter’s primary school, a project that could be somehow connected to activities during Book Week, to link writing and reading together and make it fun. It was also designed as a way of encouraging reluctant writers – especially in Key Stage 2, the top three years of school – to develop the writing skills that would stand them in good stead as they moved towards secondary school.

If all that sounds like a tall order, that’s only because the outcomes of simple ideas can be amazing. It’s easy to make newspaper projects educationally sound, but if a project has a few disruptive elements to it, children – who love the suspension of the normal order of things – truly engage in the learning, which was the aim all along.

To achieve that, a science fiction theme was set and work began on the construction of a few props to kick off the fun with – details below. Newspaper publication was the reward that would spur pupils on in their writing, but a subject, a setting and inspiration was needed to get them to start without even realising it.

In short, a simple, convincing crash scene was mocked up in the school playing field and children were breathlessly summoned to view the wreckage as morning assembly came to an end. CDs were ‘discovered’ on the machine, one for each class and each with its own message from ‘Fiona’, a time-travelling, living computer from the year 3014. Fiona set the pupils their tasks, a speculative fiction challenge to write about what they think life will be like in the future. One class is given a more conventional newspaper brief, to report on the whole Fiona story.

The next stage was how to turn this craziness into an opportunity for the class teacher. A subject we will return to in the next instalment.

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Props and materials

How far you go with your set-up is entirely up to you, but in this case, a few cheap DIY theatre props went a long way to providing a bit of back-story and ensuring that the situation was unusual enough to catch and fire the pupils’ imaginations:

  • Time machine
    Made from an odd-shaped box covered in silver foil, bits of dead circuit board from redundant TV remotes and some steam-punk ducting.
  • Spare mobile phone
    A siren and warning klaxon were provided by a mobile phone, rigged up to battery-powered speakers with a custom ringtone knocked up in a software sound editor and triggered by discretely ringing the phone.
  • Christmas lights
    Two sets of flashing LED lights were installed to create a pleasing pulsing light display
  • Smoke in a can
    An aerosol of smoke in a can, available from Maplin, was buried up to its nozzle next to the wreck in a way that enabled it to be operated with a foot.
  • CDs of messages from the future
    Fiona’s script was recorded as it was read aloud by computer screen-reading software. The sound file was then manipulated in Audacity, a free PC/Mac sound editor.

In the next instalment Ian will talk about organising his class of students and generating content for their newspaper. Tune in tomorrow!

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Filed under: case studies, guest blog, Newspaper Stories, students

Winter Wonderland

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There’s only a few weeks left of summer but never mind — this lovely photo book from photographer Takeshi Suga has us looking forward to wintry days. Winter Wonderland is a 12-page tabloid newspaper of dream-like Japanese landscapes photographed at the beginning of 2013. ‘The scenery I photograph is somewhat whimsical and delicate,’ writes Suga, ‘blurring the boundaries between reality and fantasy.’ Limited to 300 copies, the newspaper has an introduction from Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley of similarly dreamy pop band Tennis. Suga writes about his project:

In Winter Wonderland I am exploring the idea of a wonderland in wintertime Japan. Despite our culture being increasingly westernized and Christmas becoming almost as important of an event to celebrate as New Year’s, “Winter Wonderland”, a winter-time song written in 1934 by Felix Bernard and Richard B. Smith, is relatively unknown in Japan. This reminded me of the fact that we imported the word ‘wonderland’ and while a number of imported words and cultural elements such as ‘Christmas’ have been assimilated into Japanese culture, ‘wonderland’ is a word many Japanese people have heard of but many people have never wondered what it is. This in turn raised the question whether or not a wonderland can be discovered in Japan.

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Through this sequence of imagery, I seek to convey that the idea of a winter wonderland, which was formed in the west, can also be applied to Japanese winter landscapes. Winter in some parts of Japan can be extremely harsh with heavy snowfall and fewer hours of sunlight than any other season but these images of landscapes show that becalmed beauty and wonder do exist in the moments of euphoric serenity the season also offers every now and then – that is where I believe Winter Wonderland resides.

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Winter Wonderland is currently available at bookshops in 7 cities in 6 different countries– Kobe, Tokyo, London, Barcelona, Brussels, Oslo and Amsterdam.

You can order a copy of Winter Wonderland online through Utakatado Publishing. See more of Takeshi Suga’s work on his website and keep up with upcoming projects on Instagram. Thank you for printing with us!

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Filed under: art, Newspaper Stories

Paper of the Month: Everything for Breakfast

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Our Paper of the Month for July is Everything for Breakfast from Sheffield-based illustrator David Hill. Set in a brilliantly drawn universe, the 20-page digital tabloid starts off with an invitation to a birthday breakfast on a lighthouse. The story follows an adventurer in a fabulous jumper, making her way across the world one breakfast at a time — it’s our kind of comic. Just look at that bedroom!

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Unfortunately we can’t jump into the pages, but David was happy to tell us a bit more about his comic:

Everything for Breakfast is the result of my final university project, where I wanted to create something for children to interact with, to read through, and to implicitly receive the message of the importance of acceptance and tolerance amongst different cultures.

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I use my child protagonists – Scottish Explorer Aggie and Ghanaian food lover Kofi – to get the message across in their own unique way. In issue one, Aggie encounters the Tunnel Dudes, a grumpy set of postmen, who become both help and hindrances throughout. They reluctantly help her on her way south towards the Congo jungle so she can find the best present for Kofi’s birthday, while eating all the breakfast she can before setting off again.

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Children’s comics have been around for many years, though a gap seems apparent in educational comics for kids who are becoming more socially independent as they move from primary to secondary school. With this project I was hoping to bridge that gap with my contribution.

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I see the comic being read by kids in schools during the morning breakfast routine, or at break time, so I wanted the comic to be a larger format than the usual issued comic of today, and saw that our University’s graduation brochure was being printed through Newspaper Club. I’ve been aware of the company for a while so this was the perfect excuse to see what my work looks like as a newspaper. The results are great, and I didn’t expect the company to be so personal with the project! And now I know how to make Issue 2 even better.

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This is just the first of a planned four installments, and we can’t wait for the next issue. Thanks for printing with us, David!

About Paper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one paper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a paper with us, share your paper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

 

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Filed under: art, case studies, illustration, Newsagent, Newspaper Stories, Paper of the Month, students

The buzz about The Stinger

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We printed the first issue of music magazine The Stinger in February and last month they published their third issue. It’s a cracking publication out of Hastings covering local music news and history, from interviews with current acts to ‘I Was There’ accounts of gigs gone by (like the Sex Pistols and Nick Cave playing Hastings Pier). It’s all put together by volunteers, working with the Fat Tuesday charity, and distributed locally for free. Managing Editor Andy Gunton wrote to tell us about the newspaper:

The Stinger is a free, independent, local music magazine for Hastings and the surrounding ‘1066’ area. Its aim is to help promote, support and encourage original local music. The magazine is published every other month and is written and produced by local music lovers, who are all passionate about both their hometown and the music created and played within it.

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In a very timely development, Hastings has recently been officially recognised as the ‘most musically sophisticated town in the UK’. Happily we now have a local music magazine to help celebrate and publicise that fact. The team behind the magazine want to produce engaging, educational and readable content, something that the readers would wish to keep for its own sake, instead of glancing at and casting aside.

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The design and look of The Stinger was an important consideration when first putting the magazine together. The editors wanted a magazine that looked and felt a little different to other local music and listing publications– hence producing a traditional mini newspaper instead of an A5 sized glossy publication.

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When we first heard of Newspaper Club and saw samples of their products, we knew they would be the right people to put our creation into print. We have been very happy with the service we’ve received from the Newspaper Club team, from the prompt and friendly replies to our initial enquiries, right through to the advice and help given when The Stinger finally went to print. Launching a new print magazine, albeit locally, in this digital age is a bit of a leap of faith, and a rather daunting prospect as well. So, to have a stress free printing and delivery process is very welcome, and one less thing to worry about!

You can download a copy of The Stinger online and keep up with the magazine on Twitter. Thank you for printing with us!

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Filed under: case studies, Newspaper Stories

Pond Life Papers

For the last year, David Ross, Glasgow based designer (and NPC neighbour), has been working on a collaborative product to make beautiful flat pack lamps with a whole host other local illustrators, artists and designers.

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His pondlife themed designs were created to “restore a little love for self-assembly furniture”, giving owners “a connection with the object, a greater understanding of the design and an increased sense of ownership of the product,” once they’ve teased together the simple, elegant frames.

David says: “The shades and frames were inspired by an ongoing interest in ponds, particularly the creatures, plants and structures that make up a pond’s ecosystem.”

Pond Life Laser Lamps by David Ross Design on Newspaper Club

“I made the newspapers for my exhibition primarily because I wanted the opportunity to give a greater background to the product I was launching (including information about 10 collaborators!) without having to print hundreds of sheets of paper in my studio.
Secondly, the newspaper is a far nicer object to pick-up and read than a few sheets of A4, and I hope people will be more likely to hang onto it.
And thirdly, with the Pond Life Laser Lamps I tried to create an honest and fun product – I feel that this is mirrored with a newspaper.”

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The lamps are still on display now in an exhibition at the Lighthouse in Glasgow, and can be bought through the Lighthouse shop, Tojo, or David’s website here. They also happen to feature work by the great Chris Watson, who shares our office space, and one shade by yours truly.

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Filed under: art, case studies, illustration, Newsagent, Newspaper Stories, team

Simulating flight with cardboard and newsprint

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Justin Ramsden has a brilliant job — he gets to build LEGO for a living. He’s a professional model designer, but when he’s not creating famous faces out of tens of thousands of bricks, he’s making newspapers. He recently printed a digital tabloid with us documenting his project to design a simulated Spitfire flight experience. Too cool. We wanted to know more and asked Justin to tell us about it:

On visiting the Grandma Flew Spitfires exhibition at the Air Transport Auxiliary Museum in Maidenhead as part of my third year project research whilst on the BA Design course at Goldsmiths, University of London, I was interested in engaging with the ‘most sophisticated Spit simulator available to the general public,’ and being filled with numerous emotions (along with fulfilling a childhood fantasy of flying a Supermarine Spitfire fighter plane); ultimately, I wanted to experience the thrill to fly such an iconic aircraft. However, what was placed in front of me was a lackluster version of a computer game in which one gentleman commented whilst I was observing that, ‘I only wish it gave you the sensations.’

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Entitled the Cardboard Spitfire Simulated Flight Experience, I designed a ‘crash simulator’ that was tested on various participants and performed in front of an audience. This ninety second experience was a multi-sensory display that combined multiple digital projections, pyrotechnics, a variety of emotions that the participant had been ‘designed’ to feel and a cardboard and Gaffa tape one-one scale Supermarine Spitfire Mk Ia fighter plane cockpit in which the user was seated.

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Additionally a newspaper was created to compliment a video of the experience. Having printed with Newspaper Club on previous occasions, I knew that not only would I receive a fantastic service with a fast turn around on printing and delivery, but the aesthetic of a newspaper matched my cardboard lo-fi fabrication. I am extremely pleased with how the newspaper turned out and have received numerous positive compliments from those that have seen it  — cheers Newspaper Club!
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You can see more of Justin’s work on his website and follow him on Twitter. Thanks for sending such an unusual project our way, Justin!

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Filed under: case studies, Newspaper Stories, students

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