Design Is Everything: Paul Rand at MCNY

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Should you find yourself in New York in the next few months, there’s a really lovely collection of Paul Rand’s work on display at the Museum of the City of New York until 19 July. Rand started out designing clever graphics for newspapers and magazines in the 1930’s – as the New York Times puts it, he ‘started his career as a 20-year-old wunderkind and never stopped being brilliant.’ This small but dense exhibition explores his brilliance in everything from book covers to light bulb packaging. Very recommended!

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Filed under: art, design, field trip, illustration, museum

Linzie Hunter’s Hand-Lettered Resolutions

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New Year’s resolutions are fleeting things. So we’re grateful to Linzie Hunter for putting such a delightful collection of them on paper, immortalised in digital tabloid form. Linzie is a Scottish-born illustrator based in London, and her work can be found everywhere from the The Wall Street Journal to the covers of a toppling stack of books published by the likes of Scholastic and Penguin.

Earlier this year Linzie called upon her social media following for New Year’s resolutions, which she then illustrated, one resolution a day, throughout January. By the end of the month she had a wonderful series of hand-lettered good intentions.

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Linzie tells us why she decided to publish her illustrations in a newspaper:

At the end of January, I felt it would be nice to see all the images printed together in one small publication, rather than just being displayed online or printed as individual postcards. I had wanted print my own newspaper for a while so this seemed like a great opportunity and a nice way to wrap up the project.

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A large part of my commercial work is digital so I spend a lot of time staring at a computer screen. It’s great to be able to publish your work online immediately for all to see, but nothing quite compares to seeing your work in print and on paper. Traditional print-making is a lovely escape when I have the time. And it’s also nice to be able to print big on newsprint!

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I managed to squeeze in some Gocco printing and have produced some starburst-shaped postcards to send with each newspaper.

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Lizzie is sending her newspaper to friends, art directors, and existing clients. If you’re keen to get a copy for yourself, get in touch with Linzie through her website, where you can also see the full set of illustrated resolutions. Thanks for printing with us!

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Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid, illustration

21st Century Fortunes

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Manjit Thapp is a student studying illustration in London and this is her delightful newspaper comic. It’s called 21st Century Fortunes and was created in response to a brief on the theme of ‘conversation.’ It’s a great interaction between a cunning psychic and her beguiled client.

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It’s a clever and beautifully drawn story and you can read the whole thing on Cargo Collective.

 

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Manjit posts her illustrations and works in progress on her blog A Thousand Daisies and it’s well worth a visit. Thanks for printing with us!

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Filed under: digital tabloid, illustration, students

Another delightful paper from Andy Smith

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We’ve written about the joyful work of Andy Smith here before — it’s a great pleasure to see an order from him pop up in the queue. Recent Work is the third classic tabloid Andy has printed with us filled with his lovely illustrations. His drawing and lettering have been used for book jackets, magazine covers, posters, and adverts all over the world. He has a big client list to keep up with and uses a newspaper to showcase his projects. He says:

I am an illustrator and my newspaper is a collection of recent jobs that I’ve worked on. I’m sending it out to clients and friends to show them what I’ve been up to.

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There’s a mix of different things, so a page from Karl Pilkingtons book ‘The Moaning of Life’, posters for Cadburys and Travelwest and a book jacket for a Sherlock Holmes collection. The central spread is one of a series of posters that I worked on for Manchesters Dig the City, an urban gardening festival.

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The newspaper format is a great way to showcase my work. It’s a nice large size and has a familiar, tactile feel but most importantly as an illustrator a lot of my work is seen in newsprint anyway so its good for commissioners to see how my work translates to it. It’s more real than seeing it on a screen.

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All of Andy’s newspapers are for sale in The Newsagent for just £4.50 apiece. He has a great blog and you can keep up with him on Twitter, too. Thanks for printing with us again, Andy!

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Filed under: case studies, classic tabloid, illustration, Newsagent

Handsome Frank

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Handsome Frank is a small UK-based illustration agency and we’ve been delighted to print two newspapers for them so far. The latest publication came out in September and it’s filled with brilliant illustrations from the over thirty artists they represent. (If you live in London you may recognise some of the featured work, like Andrew Lyons’ Kew Gardens adverts and Jean Jullien’s Transport for London posters.) The papers were sent out to design, advertising, and publishing agencies all over to keep clients up to date with recent projects. We imagine such a well-made and, yes, handsome newspaper was a welcome delivery. Here’s what co-founder Tom Robinson had to say about it:

Frank is the newly re-designed annual newspaper from Handsome Frank illustration agency. The paper is a round up of our favourite projects from the past year. It showcases one piece of work by each of our hugely talented thirty illustrators and shows the wide range of commissions and clients we’ve been lucky enough to work with over the past twelve months.

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Collating everything together in one printed publication is a great way to demonstrate the variety and breadth of commercial projects we work on, and the diverse talents on ours books. Our clients are predominantly in the advertising and design sector and the papers have been widely distributed to agencies both her in the UK and in the US.

The paper was designed by George Bradshaw who did a superb job and we owe a special thank you to Tim McDonagh who provided the cover art (originally commissioned by the Sunday Times magazine).

If you enjoy good illustration, it’s worth keeping up with Handsome Frank on Twitter. We also recommend watching the lovely series of little films about some of the illustrators they represent. Thanks for printing with us!

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Filed under: case studies, digital tabloid, illustration

Face Me

9Poppy Skelley is an illustrator who recently finished her final year at Cambridge School of Art. She put together a digital tabloid newspaper called FACE ME, a fine collection of faces drawn over the course of her studies. Her lovely black-and-white drawings look great in newsprint, and we asked her to tell us a bit about her work:

FACE ME is a self-initiated project based on the topic of the face. I was researching into masks, faces and sculptures for a project that I was doing at university where I intended to create my own 3D busts out of clay. I had a lot of sketches and illustrations from museums and books that I produced throughout my project and I wanted to display them in some way.

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Printing through Newspaper Club was the ideal way to show my collection of illustrations and I found the online layout tool ARTHR really useful for playing around with page layout and page order.

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This paper also includes sketches made at home of my friends, self-portraits and faces drawn from my imagination. I am continuously drawing people and faces and it seems to be something that captures my interest and inspires me.

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The illustrations are produced using black and white gouache paints, pencils and pens.  I usually work with a lot of colour and texture in my illustrations, so it was a challenge to put together something that was black and white. It proved to be refreshing to work in a different way to what I am used to and I am very happy with the printed result.

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You can buy prints of Poppy’s drawings, including sketches from FACE ME, in her online shop. She keeps a very lovely illustration blog, too. Thanks for printing with us, Poppy!

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Filed under: art, ARTHR, case studies, illustration, Newspaper Stories

Paper of the Month: Medea/Worn

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We recently printed our 6 millionth (!) newspaper but we’re still constantly being surprised by new and imaginative uses for newsprint. Our Paper of the Month for September is a perfect example: Medea/Worn is a script for an original play printed in the style of a 1950s dress pattern. It’s a beautiful piece of work, printed as two separate digital tabloids that are folded together. The paper was designed by writer and illustrator Emily Juniper, who was just nominated for Best New Playwright in the Off West End awards. We asked Emily to tell us more about project:

Medea/Worn is a limited edition, illustrated script, designed to look and feel like a 1950s dress pattern.  I explored the narrative of Medea’s bloody decision by giving voice to her wedding gown. I wanted to give voice to her wedding gown, as it turned from innocent dress to murder weapon. I wanted this transition to act as a vehicle for Medea to explore her justification and anguish as she considers the consequences of her horrific notion, that she must slay her own children in order to punish Jason completely for his treachery.

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I hand-made pocket-gusset envelopes, risograph printed by Ditto Press, which you must tear open to discover the folded sheets of newsprint within.  The quality of paper was so important to me, and the Newspaper Club allowed me to produce pages that really look and feel like the real thing.

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I’m currently studying for an MA in Illustration and Authorial Practice at Falmouth University.  When I was commissioned by The Faction Theatre Company to write a version of Medea, I felt it was a great project to combine with my exploration of illustration.

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I wanted to create a space for the play text that would utilise the performative quality of paper and also exploit the intimate encounter of the book as an object.

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As the new character in Medea was going to be her gown, I chose to set my poetic text against the schematic drawings of a dress pattern.  I loved the tension between the dense words and economical drawings.

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I sourced vintage patterns and created a grid for my words.  As Medea begins to lose her mind, the formal structures of the pattern disintegrate and the final page, when she has made the decision to kill her children, is blank.

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My hope is that the mathematical lines and shapes provide the same canvas for the imagination as is employed when unpicking metaphors or similes in prose.  Which is why this seemingly disparate connection between poetry and schematic drawings can be made.  The drawn lines in the pattern are compared to the folds and falling of fabric, but one is ink on a page and one is a three dimensional object. The conjuring act involved in this might be compared to the way Shakespeare describes winter branches as Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. The writer asks the reader to perform an act of poetic creation. This is what an illustrator is doing with ink lines on the page.  It is not the same thing as the object, yet it invokes it.

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Congratulations Emily, and thank you for sharing your brilliant project with us!

About Paper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one paper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a paper with us, share your paper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

 

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Filed under: case studies, illustration, Newsagent, Paper of the Month, students, theatre

The Assumption

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Fionnuala Doran is a student at the Royal College Art who recently won the British Library’s Comics Unmasked competition. Her work engages with history through simple, striking illustration — like this wonderful drawing of Tippoo’s Tiger from a series of sketches from the V&A. The Assumption is a 16-page graphic novelette printed as a digital broadsheet. You can see the comic in its entirety in The Newsagent. Fionnuala tells us about her project:

The Assumption is the end result of my first year studying Visual Communication at the Royal College of Art, and was developed initially as a very loose adaptation of Julian Barnes’ short story Shipwreck.

The Assumption tells the story of the almost forgotten 1879 death of a ten year old boy during a riot in the small market town of Lurgan, Northern Ireland, the attempts to define the circumstances of his death by both his family and the police and the subsequent events in the town, the truth of which has never been determined.

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Thank you for printing with us, Fionnuala! You can find more comic newspapers under the ‘illustration’ tag in The Newsagent.

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Filed under: art, case studies, illustration, Newsagent

Paper of the Month: Everything for Breakfast

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Our Paper of the Month for July is Everything for Breakfast from Sheffield-based illustrator David Hill. Set in a brilliantly drawn universe, the 20-page digital tabloid starts off with an invitation to a birthday breakfast on a lighthouse. The story follows an adventurer in a fabulous jumper, making her way across the world one breakfast at a time — it’s our kind of comic. Just look at that bedroom!

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Unfortunately we can’t jump into the pages, but David was happy to tell us a bit more about his comic:

Everything for Breakfast is the result of my final university project, where I wanted to create something for children to interact with, to read through, and to implicitly receive the message of the importance of acceptance and tolerance amongst different cultures.

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I use my child protagonists – Scottish Explorer Aggie and Ghanaian food lover Kofi – to get the message across in their own unique way. In issue one, Aggie encounters the Tunnel Dudes, a grumpy set of postmen, who become both help and hindrances throughout. They reluctantly help her on her way south towards the Congo jungle so she can find the best present for Kofi’s birthday, while eating all the breakfast she can before setting off again.

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Children’s comics have been around for many years, though a gap seems apparent in educational comics for kids who are becoming more socially independent as they move from primary to secondary school. With this project I was hoping to bridge that gap with my contribution.

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I see the comic being read by kids in schools during the morning breakfast routine, or at break time, so I wanted the comic to be a larger format than the usual issued comic of today, and saw that our University’s graduation brochure was being printed through Newspaper Club. I’ve been aware of the company for a while so this was the perfect excuse to see what my work looks like as a newspaper. The results are great, and I didn’t expect the company to be so personal with the project! And now I know how to make Issue 2 even better.

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This is just the first of a planned four installments, and we can’t wait for the next issue. Thanks for printing with us, David!

About Paper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one paper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a paper with us, share your paper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

 

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Filed under: art, case studies, illustration, Newsagent, Newspaper Stories, Paper of the Month, students

Observe: Cambridge Edition

 

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It’s always tempting to sneak a look when you come across someone drawing in a sketchbook. But sometimes you’re lucky enough to be given a guilt-free glimpse in the form of a newspaper. Hannah Blackman-Kurz is a terribly talented illustrator — she’s written a gorgeous children’s book called The Qalupalik and designed posters for the Cambridge Arts Theatre – who has published bits of her travelling sketchbook as a 12-page digital tabloid. Observe is a collection of drawings she did in her local coffee shops, and she tells us a bit about the project:

Observe was a self initiated day project that was based in Cambridge coffee shops. It was a experimentation on how my images would feel placed on a newspaper format and if it gave a different quality to the images, it also fitted the theme of coffee shops and how newspapers are associated with them.

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It was great to see how they finally turned out, it gave the images more of a tactile approach where people can pick them up and don’t feel they have to be so precious with it unlike going through someone’s sketchbook. I’m going to keep experimenting hopefully there shall be a few more editions over the the summer! Thanks Newspaper Club!

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We love Hannah’s work and you can see more of it on her blog. Thank you for printing with us!

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Filed under: art, case studies, illustration, Newsagent, students

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