The Memoirs of Sweet Fanny Adams

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The Memoirs of Sweet Fanny Adams is a delight. The comic, from illustrator Fran Colomb, follows down-on-her-luck seamstress Fanny, who daydreams of triple-tiered cake stands and looks a bit like Tintin in ballet pumps. It’s a very British sort of story, quaintly bleak with so many tiny, witty details (like a poster wall with advertisements for a kitten circus and Wonderful Seances – Ectoplasm Guaranteed).

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It’s really lovely storytelling. We asked Fran to tell us more about the Fanny Adams project:

I printed Chapter One of The Memoirs Of Sweet Fanny Adams with the aim of working out the look and feel of a longer project. I wanted to get something printed and out there to see if people were interested enough for me to continue (and to have a bit of a party along the way.)

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After hunting around on the zine scene for an affordable printer, Newspaper Club was the easiest and most affordable way of doing it. As the artwork is digital, the first time I saw the whole piece on paper was when the proof came through the post. As the story involves the gutter press and celebrity, tomorrow’s chip paper  lends itself well to the project. (I had been looking at a lot of printed ephemera, especially the throw away kind, whilst researching the graphics.)

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I printed 50 digital tabloid copies which I personally editioned, handmade some Belly bands and calling cards, and had a launch party at a pub in London. As I like a bit of lo/no budget, I also made myself a website from scratch.

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I was extremely pleased with the colour quality of the newspaper and found ARTHR very easy to use once I’d got my head around it and email enquiries were answered very promptly by Newspaper Club.

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Chapter One of Sweet Fanny Adams is part of a much longer graphic novel project. I intend to continue publishing the chapters in part works or “feuilleton,” but haven’t entirely decided which direction I want to go yet. But I’m happy with the results so far and have had plenty of interest – I have recouped my print costs already. Watch this space!

Thanks for printing with us, Fran! Please keep us posted on the next issue.

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Filed under: ARTHR, case studies, digital tabloid, illustration

Graham McDougal and Boston Print Club

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We printed Graham McDougal‘s trippy Untitled [Hotzesstrasse 23] tabloid newspaper over two years ago and it has remained a solid office favourite. We came across it again on Instagram recently (on display at the Baltimore Publications Fair) and figured it was high time we shared this fantastic paper on the blog. We knew nothing about the hypnotic publication, so we asked Graham to tell us about his work:

Untitled [Hotzesstrasse 23] references the street address of a defunct company that manufactured clichés for the printing industry. This publication is based on a series of advertisements published in Graphis magazine between 1969 and 1977. It presents a series of distortions applied to the Graphis pages and documents a series of paintings based on these redacted forms.

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Untitled [Hotzesstrasse 23] is printed on tabloid web-press newsprint and uses single process colors, black and full (cmyk) color to document a range of production; from scanner drags to studio installation views. The edition includes variable, screen-printed additions on the inside cover pages.

Graham shares a lovely studio (pictured below) with Elizabeth Corkery, who runs Print Club Boston. Elizabeth is a printmaker who produces beautiful, limited-edition silkscreen prints and aims to establish a community print shop in Boston. (If you’re in the area, sign up for updates.)

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Untitled [Hotzesstrasse 23] will soon be for sale through in-the-works Print Club Book Club, but in the meantime you can buy a copy at Printed Matter (or, if you’re an artist or maker yourself, perhaps you can wrangle a print swap).

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Filed under: art, case studies, classic tabloid, illustration

Minnesota Landscapes

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Rebecca Silus is an artist based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She runs Field Office Studio and is the recent recipient of an Artist Initiative Grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board. Her work is concerned with history and place and travel, as her digital tabloid newspaper Minnesota Landscapes beautifully demonstrates. Taking inspiration from the journals of 18th and 19th century explorers, Minnesota Landscapes is a year-long sketchbook project that Rebecca describes as ‘studies of Minnesota’s natural and built landscapes, small in scale and produced with minimal materials.’

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Rebecca wrote about the paper on her blog, explaining:

The choice [of newsprint] seemed like a good fit for two reasons. The project referenced the sketchbooks kept by 18th and 19th century explorers in Minnesota, so conceptually I liked using the popular media of the time—the newspaper. Second, the tabloid format was so much larger than any book. It allowed me to feature one large painting across two pages in the middle of the newspaper, which could be hung on the wall as a poster.

I was super happy with the results and can’t wait to make another. It was so easy—they have software that simplifies the layout process if you don’t want to start completely from scratch. Or you can do what I did and layout a custom design in InDesign, then upload it.

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You can see more of Rebecca’s work on her website and follow her dreamy travels on Instagram. Thank you for printing with us!

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Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid, illustration

Imagining Leo Kannerschool

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Leo Kannerschool is a special needs school in the Netherlands. The school offers a unique learning environment for children with autism and commissioned artist Aad Goudappel to create a series of illustrations representing their values. The result is a wonderful project interpreting themes of community, independence, structure, and self-expression.

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Ankie Stoutjesdijk led graphic design on the project, creating a poster for the school using Aad’s illustrations. She was so taken with the work that she decided to print a digital tabloid newspaper keepsake for herself. ‘I’m so in love with the illustrations, and wanted to see how it would work on newsprint,’ she tells us. ‘I’m also in love with Newspaper Club and printed matter in general!’

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Filed under: case studies, community, digital broadsheet, illustration, Newspaper Stories

Paper of the Month: Monogamy

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Our Paper of the Month for April is Monogamyfrom University of Hertfordshire illustration student Gemma Louise. We fell in love with her digital tabloid newspaper, which was inspired by the true relationship between two inseparable greylag geese (Gemma saw the story in a documentary on animal behavior and crafted a university project around it.)

With wonderfully textured and expressive illustrations, Monogamy is truly beautiful storytelling – a publication we’d happily settle down with for a lifetime.

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About Paper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one paper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a paper with us, share your paper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

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Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid, illustration, Paper of the Month, students

Which Mushroom is This?

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It’s risky business handling mushrooms, but you can safely examine deadly Amanita phalloides in the pages of Justus Gelberg‘s digital tabloid publication. Like amateur foragers, we were drawn to his mushroom illustrations without understanding their purpose (the text is all in German). It turns out the paper is exactly what it looks like, a field guide to fungus identification. Justus is a student at HFG Offenbach and created the newspaper for a book design project. He tells us more:

 Silberlöffel & Zwiebel was conceived as part of a seminar by Professor Sascha Lobe on book redesign. The book Welcher Pilz ist das? (Which Mushroom is This?) was used as the basis for my design project.

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This nature guide presents mushrooms from the whole of Europe and describes the criteria with which their species can accurately be determined; one receives detailed knowledge directly from the pictures. The basis book shows each mushroom species with a text, photos or illustrations in various formats.

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The realisation of my redesign is concentrated on the category of poisonous mushrooms, which especially fascinate me. I replaced the photos with sketch-like illustrations, but retained the texts of the basis book which concerned themselves with poisonous mushrooms, their categorization and description, and their symptoms.

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To contrast with typical nature guides, I chose the atypical format of 375 x 520 mm to demonstrate the aesthetic quality and beauty of poisonous mushrooms.

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The decision to print the nature-guide on newspaper was also atypical. The paper and low grammage dissolve the classical book character and transportable nature characteristic of nature-guides. Typographically I decided to use the clear and simple typography “Maison Neue.”

Newspaper field guides may be slightly impractical, but such clean and bold illustration looks wonderful on newsprint. A publication for the armchair mushroom hunter, then. Thanks for printing with us, Justus!

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Filed under: case studies, digital tabloid, illustration

Behold the Shattered Dogs

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Sorry canine lovers, but Behold the Shattered Dogs isn’t really about dogs. The collaboration between illustrator Bill Rebholz and writer Elberto Mueller, based out of Minneapolis and Oakland respectively, is rather a collection of offbeat poetry touching on subjects from homesickness to lost love to stolen sushi. Elberto’s poems are paired with Bill’s imaginative drawings and the result is a wonderfully synergetic digital tabloid zine. So how’d it come about? Bill says:

Both of us enjoy aimless doodling, and Elberto would always share his writing with me, so eventually we kind of put it together that we should collaborate on something together. The drawings were definitely informed by the poems, some of them reflecting subject matter in the poems, and some slightly abstracted from any real meaning.​

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Three cheers for aimless doodling! Bill still has a few copies of the zine left for sale on his website, so snap them up while you can. You can also follow the excellent adventures of Bill and Elberto on Instagram.

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Filed under: case studies, digital tabloid, illustration, poetry, zines

Design Is Everything: Paul Rand at MCNY

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Should you find yourself in New York in the next few months, there’s a really lovely collection of Paul Rand’s work on display at the Museum of the City of New York until 19 July. Rand started out designing clever graphics for newspapers and magazines in the 1930’s – as the New York Times puts it, he ‘started his career as a 20-year-old wunderkind and never stopped being brilliant.’ This small but dense exhibition explores his brilliance in everything from book covers to light bulb packaging. Very recommended!

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Filed under: art, design, field trip, illustration, museum

Linzie Hunter’s Hand-Lettered Resolutions

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New Year’s resolutions are fleeting things. So we’re grateful to Linzie Hunter for putting such a delightful collection of them on paper, immortalised in digital tabloid form. Linzie is a Scottish-born illustrator based in London, and her work can be found everywhere from the The Wall Street Journal to the covers of a toppling stack of books published by the likes of Scholastic and Penguin.

Earlier this year Linzie called upon her social media following for New Year’s resolutions, which she then illustrated, one resolution a day, throughout January. By the end of the month she had a wonderful series of hand-lettered good intentions.

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Linzie tells us why she decided to publish her illustrations in a newspaper:

At the end of January, I felt it would be nice to see all the images printed together in one small publication, rather than just being displayed online or printed as individual postcards. I had wanted print my own newspaper for a while so this seemed like a great opportunity and a nice way to wrap up the project.

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A large part of my commercial work is digital so I spend a lot of time staring at a computer screen. It’s great to be able to publish your work online immediately for all to see, but nothing quite compares to seeing your work in print and on paper. Traditional print-making is a lovely escape when I have the time. And it’s also nice to be able to print big on newsprint!

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I managed to squeeze in some Gocco printing and have produced some starburst-shaped postcards to send with each newspaper.

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Lizzie is sending her newspaper to friends, art directors, and existing clients. If you’re keen to get a copy for yourself, get in touch with Linzie through her website, where you can also see the full set of illustrated resolutions. Thanks for printing with us!

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Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid, illustration

21st Century Fortunes

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Manjit Thapp is a student studying illustration in London and this is her delightful newspaper comic. It’s called 21st Century Fortunes and was created in response to a brief on the theme of ‘conversation.’ It’s a great interaction between a cunning psychic and her beguiled client.

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It’s a clever and beautifully drawn story and you can read the whole thing on Cargo Collective.

 

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Manjit posts her illustrations and works in progress on her blog A Thousand Daisies and it’s well worth a visit. Thanks for printing with us!

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Filed under: digital tabloid, illustration, students

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