Mapping conversations about Modern Scottish Women in newsprint

Modern Scottish Women newspaper for National Gallery of Scotland and the Glasgow Women's LibraryModern Scottish Women: A Mapped Conversation digital tabloid newspaper

Earlier this year, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art and Glasgow Women’s Library teamed up to invite a range of women’s groups to respond to the major exhibition Modern Scottish Women: Painters & Sculptors 1885–1965, which ran at the Scottish National Gallery from 7 November 2015 to 26 June 2016.

They documented the project in a digital tabloid newspaper, Modern Scottish Women: A Mapped Conversation, and launched the publication at Pig Rock Bothy last month.

We asked Claire Walsh at the Glasgow Women’s Library to tell us more about the project.

Modern Scottish Women newspaper for National Gallery of Scotland and the Glasgow Women's Library
Modern Scottish Women: A Mapped Conversation launch event at Pig Rock Bothy

We invited women from a wide range of cultures, ages and backgrounds to engage with the paintings and sculptures on display, and to respond to these themes through activities including creative writing, printmaking and themed conversations.

The key themes behind this exhibition – career sacrifices, women’s roles and responsibilities, strength, ambition, and equality – were the focus of our collaborative project.

Modern Scottish Women newspaper for National Gallery of Scotland and the Glasgow Women's LibraryModern Scottish Women: A Mapped Conversation digital tabloid newspaper

Modern Scottish Women: A Mapped Conversation lays out some of the group activities and brings different voices together on the page as a way of sharing experiences and thoughts on themes that resonate with the lives of many women today. The six groups involved are listed above and the colours relate to quotes from their discussions which are printed inside.

The groups involved include: Amina, Sikh Sanjog, Shakti Women’s Aid, Bonnie Fechters, Young Critics, Seeing Things.

Women in conversation about Modern Scottish Women exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern ArtWomen in conversation about Modern Scottish Women: Painters & Sculptors 1885–1965

The idea behind the project was to give a social-cultural context to the work and the themes that run through the exhibition, and to encourage these groups of women – many of which are themselves underrepresented in Scottish culture – to talk about the work and to engage with it.

Modern Scottish Women newspaper for National Gallery of Scotland and the Glasgow Women's Library
Modern Scottish Women: A Mapped Conversation digital tabloid newspaper

We decided to produce a print publication as we were keen for the participants to have something physical to take away at the end of the project. As many of the women from the groups we worked with don’t regularly access online content, we felt that print would be more appropriate.

We worked with graphic designer Kirsty McBride, who recommended a newspaper format as it allows for the chronology of the content to be read in many different ways by rearranging the sheets. At the same time, the familiarity of a newspaper gives each arrangement a sense of cohesion. This was important as what we were aiming to capture was a series of non-linear conversations.

Modern Scottish Women newspaper for National Gallery of Scotland and the Glasgow Women's LibraryModern Scottish Women: A Mapped Conversation digital tabloid newspaper

This project is a precursor for an upcoming project run collaboratively by GWL and SNGMA, which invites members of the same women’s groups to participate in an artist and archivist-led project with the archive at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art. It made sense to produce an archival object in the form of the newspaper so that the groups were themselves represented within the archive as well as being participants in the project.

You can read a copy of the newspaper at the Glasgow Women’s library and at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Archive and Library

It’s Nice That says B-SIDES is one of “the best bits that came through the letterbox in July”

B-Sides digital tabloid explores the visual language of Brighton through the eyes of graphic designer Ian Caulkett

We were excited to see Ian Caulkett‘s B–SIDES newspaper included in It’s Nice That‘s monthly round-up of “the best bits that came through the letterbox” for July. (more…)

Peter’s Yard puts fika in print with The Perfect Host

The Perfect Host traditional mini newspaper for Peter's YardBeing a good host is more than a courtesy in Sweden – it’s a way of life. Swedes have long embraced the concept of fika, a daily gathering with friends and family to share conversation and baked goods. Peter’s Yard wants to introduce the rest of the world to fika, and they’re using their award-winning sourdough crispbread, and a traditional mini newspaper, to do it.The Perfect Host traditional mini newspaper for Peter's YardWarran Brindle of COUNTRY worked with Peter’s Yard to tell their story in a friendly, conversational format. The Perfect Host is an extension of fika: a neat little take-home catalogue to share history, recipes and advice with readers. It’s the next best thing to gathering around a table.

The Perfect Host traditional mini newspaper for Peter's YardThe Perfect Host on display at the Summer Fancy Food Show in New York City in June 2016.

The newspapers are distributed internally, displayed at trade shows and sent out to customers. Brindle is currently working on another edition of The Perfect Host for Peter’s Yard suppliers in the US.The Perfect Host traditional mini newspaper for Peter's Yard“We have always wanted to produce a newspaper for Peter’s Yard,” says Brindle. “We are both thrilled with the final result from Newspaper Club.”

You can see the full range of Peter’s Yard crispbreads on their website and find inspiration for creative toppings on Instagram.

Learn more about our traditional mini newspapers.

Stapled and trimmed like a magazine – perfect for catalogues, comics, and zines. These booklet-sized newspapers are a great way to tell your story, with the vibrant colours that come from traditional newspaper printing.

Posted by Sarah | Comments (0)

Filed under: branding, case studies, food, traditional mini

Storytelling from performance to print with a programme for National Theatre Wales

Before I Leave traditional tabloid newspaper for National Theater Wales

Founded in 2010, National Theatre Wales brings storytellers together in unconventional settings – “from forests to beaches, from aircraft hangars to post-industrial towns, village halls to nightclubs.” Their latest production, Before I Leave, takes place in a library that serves as a meeting place for individuals living with dementia.

Inspired by the Cym Taf choir, writer Patrick Jones says the play is “a testament to the healing power of song.” It’s also a celebration of the strength in community and the production took an “uninhibited, direct and communal approach – from performance through to print.”

Before I Leave traditional tabloid newspaper for National Theater Wales

National Theatre Wales worked with designer Paul Thomas of Bwtîc to create a fittingly egalitarian and tactile newsprint programme. “It follows the text’s lead,” says Thomas. “Resolutely for the people, for one and all – a key connection for a play championing the necessity of community and humanity.”

Before I Leave traditional tabloid newspaper for National Theater Wales

Thomas devised three separate covers for the programme to profile central cast members in a bold, two-colour palette. “Each cover is a spotlight,” he says, “giving every character centre stage to tell their own story.”

Before I Leave traditional tabloid newspaper for National Theater Wales

“The traditional mini format was perfect for reading in the theatre space – stitched together, with its smaller size reducing the risk of elbow-knocking nuisance or paper-folding fiddling. A tidy little take-home and an enduring campaign for our cause.”

Before I Leave ran at the Sherman Theatre in Cardiff from 27 May – 11 June 2016. Find out what’s on next by following @ntwtweets.

Learn more about our traditional mini newspapers.

Stapled and trimmed like a magazine – perfect for catalogues, comics, and zines. These booklet-sized newspapers are a great way to tell your story, with the vibrant colours that come from traditional newspaper printing.

Posted by Sarah | Comments (0)

Filed under: case studies, theatre, traditional mini

Newspaper of the Month: Penny

Newspaper of the Month: Penny MagazineOur Newspaper of the Month for June is Penny, a new, collaborative publication of illustrated flash prose. After a year-long digital experiment, Penny launched not one, but two print editions: a perfect-bound magazine and a digital tabloid newspaper. They polled their readers to pick the final format – and newsprint won!

Issue One features work from 34 established and emerging illustrators and writers, including Jerome Charyn (whom Michael Chabon calls “one of the most important writers in American literature”).

We caught up with co-editor Kate Thomas to find out why they made the leap from digital to newsprint and what the future holds for Penny.

Newspaper of the Month: Penny MagazinePenny Issue OneIllustration by Haejin Park.

Penny celebrates flash prose. What is flash prose and what inspired you to start a publication about it?

Flash prose is very short fiction, creative nonfiction or prose poetry. Flash prose is perfect for the new and unusual, because the reader gives less of their time and is more accepting of risks. It’s also a great disruptor to the everyday because it can be read on a break, a commute, really whenever and wherever.

We also wanted to be there for those who would love to read longer work, but are simply very busy. Perfect example, here’s what happened when I tried to take a picture of my husband reading our new issue of Penny tonight:

Newspaper of the Month: Penny Magazine, a publication celebrating flash fictionWhere does the name Penny come from?

Penny is named after The Penny Magazine, an illustrated British magazine (on newsprint!) from the 19th century, aimed at the working and middle classes.

Why did Penny make the move from online zine to print? Did this change your approach to the content?

Our main mission in publishing Penny is to bring more readers into the literary fold, and our move to print is a continuation of that goal. Print doesn’t have to compete with a thousand other things coming at you through your phone, and it also sits around as a reminder, inviting you to read it.

Printing on newsprint also adds a new level of interactivity, as the illustrations get second lives as posters, and in this issue, there’s even an opportunity for readers to be their own colorist for one of the illustrations (okay, it’s a coloring page).

If you’re more digitally inclined, you can still find all of our content online. Our approach to curation will remain the same: wonderful illustrated prose that is more than the sum of its parts.

Newspaper of the Month: Penny MagazinePenny Issue OneIllustration by Carlos Brito.

Penny was first printed as a magazine. Why did you decide to make a newspaper, too?

We’re actually putting them out at the same time. My editing partner, Jennifer McPheeters, and I have joked from the beginning that we are a modern-day version of The Odd Couple. She goes for all things classic, and I like to experiment, stay fluid, and pull in different ideas.

I’ve been obsessed with newsprint for years, and when we discussed the move to print, I seized on the chance to see our wonderful illustrations printed large enough to feel like it’s your whole world in that minute, and as a format it makes us affordable to more people. Jennifer envisioned a more traditional format that would look right at home on your bookshelf.

Realizing that we represented two different sections of our demographic, we developed both iterations. We’ll let our readers decide for themselves what a literary zine of illustrated prose should look like!

Newspaper of the Month: Penny MagazinePenny Issue One. Illustration by Rachel Lesser.

How do the illustrations and writing work together? Does one inform the other?

Our illustrated shorts are a call-and-response between talented artists. Sometimes the call comes from the illustrator, and sometimes it comes from the writer. But in every instance, the best combinations complement, rather than explain, each other.

What’s your favorite part of putting together a print version of Penny?

Hands down, seeing it in print. I’ve been designing digitally longer than I have in print, and though a print publication is not nearly as forgiving of mistakes as a website (you can’t undo a printed typo!), printed material gives a much more visceral satisfaction, and it feels a lot like finding treasure. I’ve been collecting old newspapers and magazines for years, so to make one is a real joy.

Newspaper of the Month: Penny MagazinePenny Issue One. Cover illustration by Mitucami Mituca.

If you live in the UK, you can get your hands on a copy of Penny in The Newsagent. Otherwise you can find it right here for $10 (or online for free).

Keep up with Penny on Twitter and look out for Issue Two, which is open for submissions now.

About Newspaper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one newspaper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a newspaper with us, share your newspaper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

How to Edit Photos of People for Digital Newspapers

How to edit photos of people for digital newspapers

We print all sorts of designs every day at Newspaper Club, and our poor presses have all manner of fine patterns and delicate lines to contend with every day. However. One of the things we continue to struggle with the most is accurately reproducing images of humans.

The problem with printing people is that we all know very well what a person looks like, and what range of colours we think of as “normal” flesh tones. As a result, the tiny colour inconsistencies that you maybe wouldn’t notice on say, a picture of a kettle, seem suddenly so huge when viewed in the face of a person.

I printed a newspaper at the end of last year as a present, filled with photos of my last year. I couldn’t get the result quite right the first time, so I came back and tried to improve the results. (n.b. these images are all of caucasians but the same advice does apply to all skin tones).

Here’s an image I wasn’t happy with from my first print. The image I sent to print is on the left, and the printed image is on the right:

You can see the original image looked pretty good. A little bit red, but it’s not so noticeable on a bright, backlit computer screen. The printed image is a little bit more lobster-y. This is because our print process adds some extra magenta ink into the mix to try to make the dark areas darker. You see how the black bits on my t-shirt aren’t really a proper black? That’s because it’s hard to get a really deep, dark colour in printing, and it’s why we add the extra magenta in the first place – it makes everything a bit richer looking. The downside to this is my poor sunburnt face.

So how can I make this better? It’s quite simple actually – just by removing some of the redness from the photograph.

Here’s my adjusted image, and the new print. The image I sent to print is on the left, and the printed image is on the right:

There are pros and cons to this – the background is now very pale because it’s too subtle to be printed. But the image of the person, which was the focus of this print, is much better – there’s much more definition in the face.

How to Make your Images Less Red

Firstly, please note this advice is just for digital printing – traditional printing doesn’t boost magenta levels to improve the appearance of blacks.

I use GIMP to edit my photography (it’s free and does almost everything that Photoshop does, except did I mention that it’s FREE) but you can use any other piece of photo editing software – the controls will be broadly similar.

GIMP doesn’t support CMYK colours, so I’m working with these images in RGB. This is not a problem at all for working with photography before printing – you can let your publishing software convert the colours to CMYK for you when you export the final PDF.

First of all I opened up the Hue/Saturation dialogue, and selected just the reds in the image from the dialogue.

Then I reduced the saturation of the reds by just moving the saturation slider. This image was really red so I reduced them quite a lot!

I hit ok, and opened up the levels dialogue. You can use this to increase the contrast in your image. Very dark areas and very pale areas don’t have so much detail in print, so I dragged the black arrow across to the first noticeable peak to make the blacks blacker, and did the same with the white to make the whites whiter. I then moved the grey arrow across towards the left to make the midtones in the image a bit paler, so the details will stand out more.

Further Examples

Here are some other images from the same newspaper I’ve tried to improve.
This image had lots of detail onscreen that completely disappeared in print. Printing newspapers just isn’t great for dark images like this.For photos like this boosting the contrast more to make the mid tones a lot paler can help to make details stand out.
This image was really red in print – much more than I expected. When you look closely at the first photo again you can see how orange it looks. A little tweaking to desaturate the red in the image and the final result was much better.

 

The sunset in this image was a little bit too intense in my first print so I really knocked back the reds in the image.This image now looks much calmer, but with hindsight I maybe preferred the first image after all!

Sometimes it’s good to just embrace your inner lobsters.

For any questions about printing colours in your newspaper, please get in touch with us at support@newspaperclub.com and we will try our best to help.

Posted by Rosemary | Comments Off on How to Edit Photos of People for Digital Newspapers

Filed under: ARTHR, case studies, catalogue, community, design, digital broadsheet, digital mini, digital tabloid, how to, photography, schools, students, team, technology

Oversized zine for XXL sights of Portland

XXL zine for Travel Portand. Photography by Danielle Delph.Portland has a long and esteemed history of zine publishing. So when Travel Portland launched a new campaign to promote the city last year, they stuck with a tried-and-tested format. Working with local artists, Travel Portland produced a dynamic series of zines to introduce visitors to the unique sights Portland.

XXL zine for Travel Portand. Photography by Danielle Delph.Some of those sights are very, very big – like the 31-foot-tall statue of legendary lumberjack Paul Bunyan, built in 1959, or the giant rotating milk carton on the roof of Sunshine Dairy Foods, which opened in the 1930s.

“I fell in love with the oversized objects of Portland,” says local photographer Danielle Delph. “So much so, that I started photographing and posting them under the hashtag #PDXXL. The series got a lot of love from Portlanders.”XXL zine for Travel Portand. Photography by Danielle Delph.It also caught the attention of Travel Portland, who worked with Delph to collect these larger-than-life landmarks in a traditional broadsheet – our biggest format – so readers could “see them in large-format glory in an oversized zine.” That includes a double-page spread of the 25-foot-long loaf of sliced bread that sits on top of Franz Bakery, established in 1906. XXL zine for Travel Portand. Photography by Danielle Delph.XXL: The Extra Extra Large Sights of Portland was available at select locations around Seattle, Vancouver, Bend and Eugene from November 2015–January 2016. In January and February 2016, pop-up newsstands in Seattle and Vancouver housed a rotating line-up of zines from the collection.

Keep up with XXL sightings around Portland with the hashtag #PDXXL and check out the rest of the wonderful zine series produced by Travel Portland.

Learn more about our traditional broadsheet newspapers. 

Big enough to hide behind, with plenty of room to say everything you need to say. Perfect for projects, posters and proposals. Printed on a traditional newspaper press.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off on Oversized zine for XXL sights of Portland

Filed under: case studies, traditional broadsheet, travel, zines

Cheers to Vinoteca’s down-to-earth wine list

Vinoteca wine list newspaper designed by dn&co

Vinoteca wants to change the way people drink wine. The bistro pioneered London’s wine-in-a-box movement and made headlines in 2014 as the first bar to offer Riesling on tap. Their approach isn’t a gimmick – banishing bottles is cheaper for customers and better for the environment (one recyclable keg replaces 26 glass bottles). It makes for a more accessible and informal dining experience, too.

Still, with a 285-strong wine list, Vinoteca wants customers to be informed about what they’re drinking. So they publish a traditional mini newspaper when they update their wine list twice a year. It’s designed by dn&co, who chose newsprint because it “embodies Vinoteca’s welcoming and easily digestible take on the complicated world of wine.”

Vinoteca wine list newspaper designed by dn&co

“There’s something about wine lists that often feels quite intimidating,” says dn&co Creative Director Patrick Eley. “A sort of dusty leather-bound reprimand from a cheerless aunt.”

Not at Vinoteca. We’ve printed two issues of their down-to-earth wine list, which reads more like annotations from a witty, wine-savvy friend. Vinoteca’s personality comes through in a welcome note from the owners (“We are so excited about the new wines on our list that we are, literally, about to cry.”) and honest staff picks (“The wines that our staff just can’t stop drinking. Even though they probably should.”)

Vinoteca wine list newspaper designed by dn&co

“We made a mini newspaper because it’s simple and immediate – something that you could put in your bag and take home at the end of the night,” says Eley. “Like Vinoteca it’s unpretentious and engaging. The format allows us to combine editorial with insightful, helpful listings, change things seasonally and crucially, doubles as a price list for the in-store shops. And there’s no leather in sight.”

Learn more about our traditional mini newspapers.

Stapled and trimmed like a magazine – perfect for catalogues, comics, and zines. These booklet-sized newspapers are a great way to tell your story, with the vibrant colours that come from traditional newspaper printing.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off on Cheers to Vinoteca’s down-to-earth wine list

Filed under: branding, case studies, food, traditional mini

A visual guide to a year’s worth of seasonal produce

Green Grocer digital tabloid illustrated newspaperMeng Yang is a Chicago-based graphic designer. When he signed up for an organic produce share from local co-op Green Grocer last year, he decided to document his weekly bounty through illustration.

Now he’s turned his drawings into a digital tabloid newspaper cataloguing 38 weeks of seasonal fruits and vegetables. It’s a wonderful visual guide to a year’s worth of organic produce – plus some cooking tips that Yang picked up along the way. Green Grocer digital tabloid illustrated newspaper by Meng Yang“I thought it would be an interesting idea to visually show the varying items that I picked up weekly,” he says. “And to highlight the quality difference of opting to shop at a local mom-n-pop shop versus the discount chains.”Green Grocer digital tabloid illustrated newspaper“Thumbing through a 52-page newspaper was the perfect format to showcase the sheer amount vegetables and fruits that run the gamut for 4 season’s worth of goods.”Green Grocer digital tabloid illustrated newspaper by Meng Yang“It was a fun project to collaborate with a fellow illustrator friend of mine, Johnny Decker Miller, and I’m extremely happy with the print quality from the newspapers.”

Thanks for printing with us!

Learn more about our digital tabloid newspapers. 

Our most popular product, great for everything from weddings to portfolios, props and posters. Easy to try out – print one copy or print hundreds.

Newspaper of the Month: Pizza Workshop Post

Pizza Workshop Post traditional tabloid newspaper

Our Newspaper of the Month for May is Pizza Workshop Postfrom Bristol-based pie slingers Pizza Workshop. The sourdough pizzeria opened last year with a simple but uncompromising mission: to make “one thing the best we possibly can.” Turns out they can make a great newspaper, too.

Their traditional tabloid looks beneath the crust of Pizza Workshop – from the Head Chef’s journey to Naples in search of a 70-year-old sourdough starter (named “Dodo”) to the specially-made wooden crates they use to keep the fermenting dough at just the right temperature.

Pizza Workshop Post traditional tabloid newspaper

The Post was designed by creative agency Moon. They built the Pizza Workshop identity right down to their lights, tables and chairs – all made in Moon’s own workshop to bespoke designs. The newspaper is an extension of Pizza Workshop’s focus on craft, and a perfect medium to tell the stories that make the restaurant special.

Pizza Workshop Post traditional tabloid newspaper

“We wanted to connect with our customers beyond providing them with great food,” says Pizza Workshop. “We wanted to show them that we go the extra mile with everything that we do. The feedback has been fantastic.”

The Post is available now at Pizza Workshop. If you’re not in Bristol, feast your eyes on their pies on Instagram. Thanks for printing with us and congratulations!

About Newspaper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one newspaper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a newspaper with us, share your newspaper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off on Newspaper of the Month: Pizza Workshop Post

Filed under: case studies, food, Newspaper of the Month, The Newsagent, traditional tabloid

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These are the posts from the Newspaper Club Blog filed under case studies.

We’re here to help everyone make and print their own newspapers.

Thanks for stopping by the Newspaper Club blog. Here you can read the stories behind some of the best papers we’ve printed—and meet the happy customers who made them. We’ll also post occasional updates about what’s going on behind the scenes and inside the presses.

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