Round up: 10 ingenious newspaper designs

Fresh flowers newspaper designed by Itunube. Printed by Newspaper Club

With the London Design Festival in full swing, we’ve rounded up 10 of the most ingeniously designed newspapers we’ve printed. From flowers that won’t wilt to a shoe-drying kit – these are the projects that made us rethink what a newspaper can be.

1. Fresh Flowers by Itunube (traditional tabloid)

A month’s worth of freshly printed flowers – just roll up a different page of the newspaper every day. No watering required.

 

2. HTTPrint by Emilie Pillet (digital broadsheet)

You might think twice about your internet habits if you confronted them in print.

That’s the idea behind HTTPrint, a Google Chrome extension developed by ECAL graduate Pillet in collaboration with Thierry Treyer. The plugin extracts images and metadata from the websites you visit and, using a script that builds representations of that data, creates a visually-striking PDF that you can print directly from your browser – or turn into a newspaper, as Pillet did.

HTTPrint, a project to turn your web browsing history into a newspaper. Designed by Emilie Pillet. Printed by Newspaper Club.

3. Rain Not Train by Vulpine (traditional tabloid)

We teamed up with cycling brand Vulpine (and some wonderful designers) to put a digital turn on an age-old solution to wet shoes. Rain Not Train is a newspaper designed specifically as a shoe drying kit, filled with illustrations and words about cycling and the rain (and cycling in the rain). After you’ve read the newspaper, you can scrunch it up to create a timeless safeguard against damp feet.

Rain Not Train newspaper shoe drying kit from Vulpine and Newspaper Club

4. This is Tokyo menu by YO! Sushi (traditional mini)

When branding experts &SMITH redesigned the YO! Sushi menus in April 2016, they took inspiration from Japan’s manga comics. They created a series of 4 graphic covers and added Kanji script to the menu alongside illustrations of new dishes, plus snippets of Tokyo-focused art and culture writing – all laid out in a neat mini newspaper that customers could take home after the meal.

Traditional mini newspaper menu for YO! Sushi designed by &Smith

5. Letterform posters by Grafik (digital broadsheet)

To celebrate the launch of their new online home, design publication Grafik Magazine hosted an exhibition of highlights from their impressive Letterform Archive. They printed a series of beautiful newspaper posters to tell the stories behind famous (and not so famous) fonts.

Newsprint posters for the Grafik.net launch (photos by Prote.in)

6. UC Quarterly by UnderConsideration (traditional mini)

With a bit of ingenuity and a lot of hard work, UnderConsideration transformed a humble traditional mini newspaper, featuring the best bits from UnderConsideration’s network of blogs, into a limited-edition delight for print lovers. Each newspaper came wrapped in a discarded makeready or test sheet reclaimed from a printer, then carefully trimmed. The covers were then hand-stamped and wrapped with another design classic – a red rubber band.

UC Quarterly newspaper designed by UnderConsideration. Printed by Newspaper Club.

7. Medea/Worn script by Emily Juniper (digital tabloid)

Commissioned by The Faction Theatre Company to rewrite the myth of Medea, writer and illustrator Juniper chose to give voice to the sorceress’s wedding gown. She printed her script on newsprint, adding crinkle-cut edges and extra folds herself to transform it into a vintage-inspired dress pattern. Juniper then packaged the scripts in hand-made gusset envelopes, risograph printed by Ditto Press

“The quality of paper was so important to me,” she told us. “I wanted to create a space for the play text that would use the performative quality of paper and also exploit the intimate encounter of the book as an object.”

Medea/Worn was our Newspaper of the Month for October 2014.

Medea/Worn script in the form of a vintage dress pattern. Designed by Emily Juniper. Printed by Newspaper Club.

8. Washed Out colouring zine by Jamie Kirk (digital tabloid)

To support Mental Health Awareness Week, illustrator Jamie Kirk created Washed Out, a zine designed to be coloured in while encouraging readers to “explore creativity and eliminate stress.” Kirk joined forced with contributors from around the world, including French illustrator Jean Jullien, Spanish illustrators Brosmind and Portland-based artist Sam Larson.

Kirk is selling Washed Out through The Newsagent with proceeds going to mental health charities.

 

9. The Dab Hand by Amy McArthur (digital tabloid)

Tasked with branding a typography-themed restaurant, design student McArthur decided to play on the relationship between foodmaking and printmaking.

“Cooking and early ‘hot type’ are both hands-on activities,” she explains. She created a newsprint menu for fictional restaurant The Dab Hand, a place where “the crafts of cooking and typography converge.”

In a clever design twist, McArthur stitched the newspaper to tear into two parts, evoking the preparation and consumption of food.

The Dab Hand by Amy McArthur

10. “Stay At Home Club”/”Who Wants Disarmament?” newsprint single by The Famines (digital broadsheet)

“Can paper solve the music industry?” asked Chart Attack when The Famines put out their newsprint single last year.

Pressing vinyl is expensive and time-consuming, so The Famines turned to newsprint to release their two new songs. They called it a “paper LP” – a 20″ x 30″ double-sided newsprint poster, designed by illustrator and Famines frontman Raymond Biesinger, with instructions to download the tracks.

“We’re the right band to experiment with the format,” Biesinger explains. “To combine the visual/paper with the digital/music and make a very unique object that’s printable in small runs, inexpensive, impressive, cheap to mail and can hold the information (ie. URL/code infos) for an online download.”

He was right – the paper single was a hit and The Famines followed it up with newsprint compilationPentagon Black Compilation #1, in February 2016.

The Famines newsprint single printed by Newspaper Club

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Do you have an ingenious use for newsprint? Order some free sample newspapers and get designing.

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Filed under: case studies, design, round up

Exploring migration through Polaroid portraits and paper boats in Another Crossing exhibition

Another Crossing exhibition at Murmurations Galllery

This month, we’re proud to sponsor Another Crossing, a joint exhibition from photojournalist Giovanna Del Sarto and artist Bern O’Donoghue exploring challenges faced by refugees and asylum seekers. (more…)

Newspaper of the Month: Full English

Sam Walker captures classic cafe culture in his photography series Full English. Printed as a digital tabloid newspaper by Newspaper Club.Full English digital tabloid newspaper by photographer Sam Walker

Our Newspaper of the Month for August is Full English, a thoughtful study of London’s cafe culture from photographer Sam Walker.

“I love cafes because of what they’ve seen,” he says. “The hangovers, the meetings, the unknown writers who could one day become famous, the break-ups and the builders.”

Photograph from Full English series by Sam WalkerPhotographs from Full English by Sam Walker

Walker mostly photographed cafes around South London, where he lives. Of the eight cafes that made it into his 28-page digital tabloid newspaper, two stuck out as favourites.

“One was Rock Steady Eddies in Camberwell, which is on the front cover,” he tells us. “Expect the same people to be in the corner every day and a plethora of photographs and memorabilia on the walls. The other was Parma Cafe in Kennington, where you eat your bacon sandwich underneath huge illustrations of Ancient Greek gods.”

He adds: “That’s actually what spawned the idea for the project, one hungover Saturday morning.”

Sam Walker captures classic cafe culture in his photography series Full English. Printed as a digital tabloid newspaper by Newspaper Club.Full English digital tabloid newspaper by photographer Sam Walker

The tiny details Walker captures so beautifully in his images – from a ring of tea spilled in a saucer to fluorescent pebbles in a fish tank – betray his deep affection for the classic cafe – an affection that was not immediately returned.

“At the start of the project, I’d been cycling all day in the rain, going from cafe to cafe, and getting turned away from every place I went to,” he admits.

“John [of John’s Cafe] was the first person who let me take photographs. He told me all about the history of his place and where he thought I should go. He was also the first person who was actually willing to be photographed himself, something that massively helped when I went to other places – I could show them the photograph of him so they’d understand what I was trying to do.”

Sam Walker captures classic cafe culture in his photography series Full English. Printed as a digital tabloid newspaper by Newspaper Club.Full English digital tabloid newspaper by photographer Sam Walker

A newspaper “fit perfectly with the setting of the photographs,” explains Walker. “I thought – what better way to present them than in a newspaper, like so many of the cafes I photographed provided.”

“I printed with Newspaper Club because I knew I’d be able to blow my photographs up to a large size, which would allow me to work with the subtle details and small nuances in the cafes and photographs. It also allows me to give something back to the communities I photographed.”

Sam Walker captures classic cafe culture in his photography series Full English. Printed as a digital tabloid newspaper by Newspaper Club.

Check out Walker’s web shop to get your hands on a copy of Full English – it goes great with a cuppa.

About Newspaper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one newspaper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a newspaper with us, share your newspaper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

New lookbooks peek behind the scenes of TINCT’s leather craft

Newspaper lookbook for TINCT luxury leather handbags. Available at their pop up shop in London, September 1 -10, 2016.
TINCT lookbooks designed by Sam Moppett and Marcel Kane of King Henry London.

It was a cat that introduced Rosie Broad of TINCT to her love of leather craft.

“I was absolutely stumped on what to give a friend for her birthday,” she told Zetteler. “She loves cats and dressing up so…I made her a leather cat mask. I loved the process and continued making ever-more intricate leather cat faces.”

Broad soon left her job at Jigsaw to focus on creating the masks full-time. But, she says, “I needed to re-invent my slightly whimsical idea.” She turned from niche masks to simple, classic bags and wallets and, in 2014, TINCT was born.

Rosie and Ben Broad in the sunny TINCT studio Rosie and Ben Broad at the TINCT studio in Chichester

Since then, Broad’s brother, Ben, has joined as a partner – “one of the best decisions I’ve made so far,” says Broad. The pair now craft a growing range of vegetable-tanned leather goods from their barn-turned-studio in Chichester.

Newspaper lookbook for Tinct luxury leather handbags. Available at their pop up shop in London, September 1 -10, 2016.TINCT lookbooks designed by Sam Moppett and Marcel Kane of King Henry London.

They’ve just published a new lookbook – an elegant 48-page traditional tabloid printed on our 70gsm bright paper stock. It’s much brighter and heavier than standard newsprint and won’t discolour with age or light – so you’re safe to leave it out on your coffee table.

Newspaper lookbook for Tinct luxury leather handbags. Available at their pop up shop in London, September 1 -10, 2016.
TINCT lookbooks designed by Sam Moppett and Marcel Kane of King Henry London.

The newspaper shows off TINCT’s products beautifully, with full-page photographs shot near their studio at West Wittering beach, but it also captures the personality of the brand. According to Broad, their lookbook is more than a catalogue. It’s “a culmination of all of the people who’ve contributed to our journey.”

“Many fashion and lifestyle labels opt for more traditional, sleek lookbooks,” she says. “But TINCT’s heritage and tactile view of the world made the option of printing on newspaper a more appealing, original and interesting option.”

Newspaper lookbook for Tinct luxury leather handbags. Available at their pop up shop in London, September 1 -10, 2016.TINCT lookbooks designed by Sam Moppett and Marcel Kane of King Henry London.

TINCT has set up a very lovely, but very temporary, pop-up shop at 121 Sydney Street in London – open now until 10 September. Pick up a lookbook for free – and check out the masks that started it all.

Newspaper lookbook for Tinct luxury leather handbags. Available at their pop up shop in London, September 1 -10, 2016.TINCT lookbooks designed by Sam Moppett and Marcel Kane of King Henry London.

See more shots from the shop and keep up with TINCT on Instagram.

Newspaper lookbook for Tinct luxury leather handbags. Available at their pop up shop in London, September 1 -10, 2016.TINCT lookbooks designed by Sam Moppett and Marcel Kane of King Henry London.

Learn more about traditional tabloid newspapersOur most popular size – perfect for catalogues, zines, comics, newsletters…the possibilities are endless. Print your own newspaper on a real high-speed newspaper press.

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Filed under: branding, case studies, catalogue, fashion, special stock, traditional tabloid

Meet Damp Squib: An interview with the GSA Comix Club about their shape-shifting zine

Issue 3 of Damp Squib by Glasgow School of Art Comix ClubIssue 3 of Damp Squib from the GSA Comix Club

Damp Squib is a shape-shifting comic zine that changes theme, format and editor each issue. Published “sporadically” by the Comix Club at the Glasgow School of Art, Damp Squib brings together an energetic range of comic styles from a rotating mix of contributors (including, in the last issue, the editor’s mum).

The third issue, which came out in June, celebrates summer getaways with an “Action, Escape, Adventure” theme. Printed as a digital broadsheet newspaper, the latest edition of Damp Squib is just 4 pages but packs a big (if slightly chaotic) visual punch when folded out into a 750mm x 520mm poster.

We caught up with Comix Club president Peter McKenna and this issue’s editor Shona Spalding to find out how they put the zine together and what the future holds for Damp Squib after they graduate.

How did Damp Squib get started?

Peter: Damp Squib started as a response to what I considered was a lack of printed visual storytelling in circulation around the Glasgow School of Art campus.

I felt that comic art was being underrepresented at GSA in spite of there being a strong community of artists and designers who I knew were engaged with the genre. To rectify this I – alongside my fellow 4th Year Illustrators –established the GSA Comix Club as a society for the production and appreciation of comic media. We held a meeting, wrote a manifesto, browsed a long list of firework names and resultantly Damp Squib was born.

The first issue, “The Pilot Episode”, was a chance to test the waters and unsurprisingly we got loads of dead good submissions!

Issue 3 of Damp Squib by Glasgow School of Art Comix ClubComics by Santiago Taberna (left) and Lucy Grainge (right) in Issue 3 of Damp Squib.

What’s the process of putting an issue together?

Peter: We made the decision early on that we wanted Damp Squib to be edited and produced by a different society member per issue to keep the publication diverse and ever-changing.

Comix Club members propose their concept for the next issue at one of our meetings: they detail their idea for the theme, print method, colour scheme etc. and then we take a vote. The newly-elected editor then goes about producing the next issue, starting with a call for submissions.

Submissions are welcomed from anyone and everyone – not limited to GSA students – and it’s the editor’s job to collate this content into whatever printed format they see fit.

Issue 1 of Damp Squib by GSA Comix ClubIssue 1 of Damp Squib (“The Pilot Episode”) archived at the GSA Library Zine Collection.

The first issue is archived at the wonderful GSA Library Zine Collection. Where else can people find Damp Squib?

Peter: It’s the duty of the Squib editor to distribute the comic – so it’s up to them where they wish to put them. Usually we circulate them about campus: in the Student’s Association, the Reid and Tontine buildings and recently we had the opportunity to showcase them at the East London Comic Art Festival (ELCAF) in Hackney as well as our own Communication Design Degree Show.

Damp Squib at ECLAFThe Damp Squib team setting up at ELCAF in London.

The comics are free and so far each issue has been produced in a limited run – so when they’re gone, they’re gone! As a society we’ve archived copies of each issue and likewise the GSA Library holds a copy of each. Other than that, if you’re after a copy I’m afraid it’s a case of having to beg, borrow or steal.

Why did you decide to publish the third issue as a newspaper?

Shona: We’d had two different formats already so it was clear that the club should keep experimenting. I decided on newspaper because I really liked the idea of it folding out to two big pages of assorted comics.

Keeping the submissions thematically linked doesn’t tend to result in a lot of coherence visually, and having them all on one page keeps things busy and promotes my kind of comic ideal.

Issue 3 of Damp Squib by Glasgow School of Art Comix ClubIssue 3 of Damp Squib from the GSA Comix Club

Finally, what are your hopes for the future of Damp Squib?

Peter: Well, given that myself and the other core Squib members have now graduated from GSA, the future of Damp Squib is relatively undecided.

In its short lifespan I think the comic has made a bit of a name for itself so we plan on passing the comic over to some current students and hopefully they can continue to populate GSA with more sequential narrative publications. We did briefly discuss stealing Damp Squib and continuing to run it from outside the walls of GSA but I feel like that’s its home now and to take it with us would be down right greedy.

There’s definitely also a lot more to be done with Damp Squib. Like I said, it made it’s debut at ELCAF this year when a group of us ran a kind of pop-up-wheel-of-fortune-performance-mask-making-comic-generator-workshop down there (which we’ll be running again at this year’s Fresher’s Week) so I guess Squib is already moving into a more multidisciplinary realm and hopefully that will continue.

Issue 3 of Damp Squib by Glasgow School of Art Comix Club
Issue 3 of Damp Squib from the GSA Comix Club

Damp Squib is currently accepting submissions for a special “Cautionary Tales” issue aimed at incoming GSA students. If you have advice about “the sticky ends and how not to meet them” send an email to damp.squib@outlook.com by 31 August 2016. Keep up with Squib news on Facebook.

Learn more about our digital broadsheet newspapers. Our biggest format makes a big impression. Great for pull-outs, posters, and portfolios.

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Filed under: case studies, comics, digital broadsheet, illustration, students, zines

Lucy Payne captures warmth and character in her illustrations of strangers’ kitchens

10 Kitchens illustrated newspaper by Lucy Payne10 Kitchens by Lucy Payne

You can learn a lot about a person from their kitchen. That’s what illustrator Lucy Payne came to understand after creating several studies of her own kitchen. “I realised what a personal and unique domain it is,” she says. “I wanted to see what other people’s kitchens meant to them.”

Payne, a student at the Glasgow School of Art, put out a call on the Scottish Women’s Institute‘s Facebook page, asking strangers to let her draw their kitchens. The response was surprisingly positive. “People I didn’t know welcomed me with open arms into their most private, domestic sphere,” she says.

10 Kitchens illustrated newspaper by Lucy Payne
10 Kitchens by Lucy Payne

Payne ended up visiting, and sketching, the kitchens of 10 strangers. She’s collected these illustrations in a digital tabloid newspaper, 10  Kitchens. She chose newsprint because it allowed space for her big, colourful drawings. “It was also a cost-effective way to print a large quantity,” she says. “And I like the traditional, tactile feeling of newspaper.”

10 Kitchens illustrated newspaper by Lucy Payne
10 Kitchens by Lucy Payne

“Each drawing session lasted around 2 hours,” Payne says, “during which time I made multiple A3 sketches. Some people stayed and chatted throughout my visit and some left me to it – even leaving me alone in their house! I admired this trust and openness.”

10 Kitchens illustrated newspaper by Lucy Payne10 Kitchens by Lucy Payne

“With those who stayed, I found 2 hours provided a small, intense block of time in which to get to know the person. Some people played music, others fed me samosas and biscuits – all made me a cup of tea.”

10 Kitchens illustrated newspaper by Lucy Payne
10 Kitchens by Lucy Payne

Copies of 10 Kitchens are available on request – send an email to lucypayne.work@gmail.com if you’d like one.

Learn more about our digital tabloid newspapers. 

Our most popular product, great for everything from weddings to portfolios to posters. They’re easy to try out, with print runs starting at just one copy.

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Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid, food, illustration, students

From wild dogs to rotten apples, Jen Leem-Bruggen illustrates the scandalous 1904 Olympic marathon

Illustrated newspaper about the 1904 Olympic marathon by Jen Lee-Bruggen1904 St. Louis Olympics newspaper by Jen Leem-Bruggen

In August 1904, the first Olympic Games outside of Europe took place in St. Louis, Missouri. This historic Games is perhaps best remembered for its scandalous marathon, which was marked by a series of bizarre events.

For example, a former mailman from Cuba who, the Smithsonian writes, arrived at the starting line “in a white, long-sleeved shirt, long, dark pants, a beret and a pair of street shoes. One fellow Olympian took pity, found a pair of scissors and cut [his] trousers at the knee.” And it only got stranger from there.

Cuban marathoner Félix Carbajal,Cuban marathoner Félix Carbajal at the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis (Photo: Brittanica.com)

Illustrator Jen Leem-Bruggen presents surreal scenes from the marathon in a digital tabloid she printed last year. With a lighthearted touch she depicts runners chased off course by wild dogs, poisoned by rotten apples and, finally, carried over the finish line (following a disabling dose of rat poison and egg whites). What a race!

Illustrated newspaper about the 1904 Olympic marathon by Jen Lee-Bruggen1904 St. Louis Olympics newspaper by Jen Leem-Bruggen
Illustrated newspaper about the 1904 Olympic marathon by Jen Lee-Bruggen1904 St. Louis Olympics newspaper by Jen Leem-Bruggen

Leem-Bruggen included the newspaper in her graduate show at the University of Hertfordshire in 2015. It looked great spread out alongside the rest of her degree work, including charming studies of temptation.

Illustrated newspaper about the 1904 Olympic marathon by Jen Lee-BruggenIllustrator Jen Leem-Bruggen’s graduate show at the University of Hertfordshire in 2015

You’d be remiss not to be keeping up with this excellent illustrator on Instagram. Thanks for printing with us!

Learn more about our digital tabloid newspapers. 

Our most popular product, great for everything from weddings to portfolios to posters. They’re easy to try out, with print runs starting at just one copy.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off on From wild dogs to rotten apples, Jen Leem-Bruggen illustrates the scandalous 1904 Olympic marathon

Filed under: case studies, comics, digital tabloid, illustration, students

Texas Joe’s brings barbecue history to London with Big Smoke Signal menu

TEXAS_JOE_015Big Smoke Signal newspaper for Texas Joe’s. Design by By Volume.

Texas Joe’s is making the Big Smoke a bit smokier. The barbecue restaurant opened in London this summer with a “spit and sawdust” approach that’s all about respecting Texas tradition.

(more…)

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Filed under: branding, case studies, food, traditional tabloid

Celebrating Morecambe’s print heritage with newspaper hats

Newspaper hat making workshop with Victoria Street Press at Street pARTy in MorecambeNewspaper hat making workshop at Street pARTy. Photograph by Bean Photo.

Here at Newspaper Club, we love discovering unexpected uses for newspaper. We’ve printed everything from photo filters to music singles to calendars on newsprint. But we’ve never lost our appreciation for the classic purposes of newspaper – like making hats.

Newspaper hat making workshop with Victoria Street Press at Street pARTy in Morecambe
Newspaper hat making workshop at Street pARTy. Photograph by Bean Photo.

Morecombe-based artist Kate Drummond recently hosted a free newspaper hat making workshop for Street pARTy, a celebration of local art and creativity. The event marked the installation of a series of new, large-scale artworks on Victoria Street in Morecambe Town Centre, including two murals that Drummond worked on alongside other artists: The Sands and the Seas Wall and A Morecambe Sporting Life.

Newspaper hat making workshop with Victoria Street Press at Street pARTy in MorecambeNewspaper hat making workshop at Street pARTy. Photograph by Bean Photo.

In a nod to Morecambe’s print heritage, Drummond designed a digital tabloid newspaper inspired by stories from Morecambe’s local newspaper, The Visitor, which was printed on Victoria Street for over 100 years.

“I designed the hat so that the print fitted exactly into where I wanted the folds to be,” says Drummond. It’s a tricky design to pull off, so Drummond used blank paper to make a model of her newspaper before printing.

“That way I could figure out where the text had to be to make it read all the way around the rim and work out which parts of the flat newspaper would be visible once it was folded,” she says. “When the centre pages are laid flat they’re quite abstract, but it makes sense once they’re folded into the hat.” A timelessly fetching hat, we might add.

Newspaper hat making workshop with Victoria Street Press at Street pARTy in MorecambeNewspaper hat making workshop at Street pARTy. Photograph by Bean Photo.

Youtube has some handy videos to teach you how to make your own newspaper hat, including this “pressman’s hat” variation.

Street pARTy was produced by Deco Publique. See more photos from the event with the hashtag #FantasticMorecambe.

Learn more about our digital tabloid newspapers. 

Our most popular product, great for everything from weddings to portfolios to posters. They’re easy to try out, with print runs starting at just one copy.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off on Celebrating Morecambe’s print heritage with newspaper hats

Filed under: case studies, community, digital tabloid, folded, newspaper crafts

Newspaper of the Month: Ultramar

Newspaper of the Month: Travel journal Ultramar from graphic designer Manon Raupp

Our Newspaper of the Month for July is Ultramar, an intricate travel journal from Toulouse-based graphic designer Manon Raupp.

The digital tabloid documents Raupp’s time in Spain and Portugal last summer, incorporating hand-written notes, drawings, collages and photographs. Printed as part of her main postgraduate project, the newspaper included a postcard with a link to videos and experiments with sound collected during the trip.

Raupp is the co-founder of new publishing collective La Perche Carrée, which produces zines inspired by travel and urban walks. We caught up with her to talk about these publishing projects and her favourite music to listen to when travelling.

Newspaper of the Month: Travel journal Ultramar from graphic designer Manon Raupp

Ultramar is about your travels through Spain and Portugal. Do you have a favourite moment (or food or place) from your trip?

The best moment of my travels was probably when I got to Faro in the off-season. The atmosphere was kind of strange. Early in the evening, I went into a tiny bar. There only were a few friends chatting together, no tables or chairs but it was too late to turn back. An hour after, I was still siting of the fridge with some fresh beers, laughing along with them!

As a graphic designer and urban walker, you’re interested in “how we appropriate our geographical surroundings.” Could you share an example?

I developed an interest in urban concepts such as psychogeography and dérive while reading Situationist texts. I also got interested in “urban safety” through interacting with homeless people. I started thinking about the way I discover an area. For example, in Granada I decided to walk through the same streets (Albayzín hill) three times: in the afternoon, in the middle of the night and the next morning, writing down new details. I grew gradually more attached and familiar with the place.

Newspaper of the Month: Travel journal Ultramar from graphic designer Manon Raupp

You recently co-founded a publishing collective, La Perche Carrée, that focuses on small travel publications. What inspired that?

When I moved to Toulouse, I met my friend Zelda in art school and we thought the best way to discover the city would be by walking around together. We wanted to share our rambles and pretty soon every trip became a pretext to make a small publication. La Perche Carrée is the logical follow-up to converge these publications and set up a dynamic structure.

Could you tell us about some of the works you’ve published so far?

In the past few months, we’ve published projects for our post graduate degrees: Ultramar and Balade à Balma (which recounts a group walk in the suburbs of Toulouse) but also Porte France Souvenirs. For that one, we went to the Spanish border with a friend for three days and we each made a contribution : comics, pictures, poetry… We like to get diverse contributions.

Newspaper of the Month: Travel journal Ultramar from graphic designer Manon Raupp

You also publish a music fanzine called Ductus Pop. What music do you listen to when you’re travelling?

I usually think of a few albums before leaving. For example, during the Ultramar trip, I just had my Walkman and several tapes (it’s not a smart thing to do, as every case broke in the bottom of my bag) including Camp Counselors, The Soft Walls and a summer compilation by Track and Field records. Mostly lo-fi and dream pop.

Finally, what are your three travel essentials?

A notebook, a camera and some anti-mosquito lotion!

_____________________

About Newspaper of the Month

Every month, we give a £100 Newspaper Club voucher to one newspaper shared in The Newsagent. If you’ve printed a newspaper with us, share your newspaper (through the settings in your account) for a chance to win.

Posted by Sarah | Comments Off on Newspaper of the Month: Ultramar

Filed under: case studies, digital tabloid, illustration, Newspaper of the Month, photography, portfolio, students, The Newsagent, travel, zines

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