Bright Old Things for Selfridges

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William Forbes Hamilton used to demonstrate magic tricks in the Toy Department at Selfridges in the 1950s before turning into a horror movie villain in such films as ‘Doctor Blood’s Coffin’. Now he’s a painter and back at Selfridges – at least back in a profile from their new publication, Bright Old Things, which celebrates the discovery of creative outlets later in life.

William is one of fourteen Bright Old Things featured in the classic tabloid newspaper printed by Selfridges earlier this year (there’s also an architect turned topiarist and product designer turned sci fi blogger).

It’s a lovely and uplifting project, featuring photography and illustrated interviews from Todd Selby. Here’s what Selfridges has to say:

Since 2011 Selfridges’ Bright Young Things has championed young creative talent, but this year the tables turned.

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Bright Old Things is Selfridges’ celebration of the retirement renaissance. Those inspirational individuals who have created a new vocation for themselves in later life. The men and women who show that creativity is ageless.

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To support this store-wide scheme, and to tell the stories of the older creatives featured in Selfridges’ world-famous windows, the team chose to work with us to create a Bright Old Things newspaper featuring amazing photography by renowned photographer, author and illustrator Todd Selby alongside insightful interviews with each of the 14 Bright Old Things.

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From ‘70s fashion editor-turned-artist Molly Parkin to legendary punk hero Bruno Wizard, each interview gives an inspirational insight into the wide possibilities that are open to us in our later years.

You can learn more about all of the Bright Old Things and follow #BrightOldThings for updates.

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Filed under: art, case studies, classic tabloid, photography

Design Is Everything: Paul Rand at MCNY

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Should you find yourself in New York in the next few months, there’s a really lovely collection of Paul Rand’s work on display at the Museum of the City of New York until 19 July. Rand started out designing clever graphics for newspapers and magazines in the 1930’s – as the New York Times puts it, he ‘started his career as a 20-year-old wunderkind and never stopped being brilliant.’ This small but dense exhibition explores his brilliance in everything from book covers to light bulb packaging. Very recommended!

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Filed under: art, design, field trip, illustration, museum

Winter Wonderland now available at Good Press

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Last year we wrote about Winter Wonderland, a publication of peaceful wintry landscapes we printed for Takeshi Suga. We’re pleased to say that you can now find Winter Wonderland amidst all sorts of other lovely zines at Good Press in Glasgow.

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Filed under: art, classic tabloid, photography

Linzie Hunter’s Hand-Lettered Resolutions

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New Year’s resolutions are fleeting things. So we’re grateful to Linzie Hunter for putting such a delightful collection of them on paper, immortalised in digital tabloid form. Linzie is a Scottish-born illustrator based in London, and her work can be found everywhere from the The Wall Street Journal to the covers of a toppling stack of books published by the likes of Scholastic and Penguin.

Earlier this year Linzie called upon her social media following for New Year’s resolutions, which she then illustrated, one resolution a day, throughout January. By the end of the month she had a wonderful series of hand-lettered good intentions.

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Linzie tells us why she decided to publish her illustrations in a newspaper:

At the end of January, I felt it would be nice to see all the images printed together in one small publication, rather than just being displayed online or printed as individual postcards. I had wanted print my own newspaper for a while so this seemed like a great opportunity and a nice way to wrap up the project.

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A large part of my commercial work is digital so I spend a lot of time staring at a computer screen. It’s great to be able to publish your work online immediately for all to see, but nothing quite compares to seeing your work in print and on paper. Traditional print-making is a lovely escape when I have the time. And it’s also nice to be able to print big on newsprint!

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I managed to squeeze in some Gocco printing and have produced some starburst-shaped postcards to send with each newspaper.

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Lizzie is sending her newspaper to friends, art directors, and existing clients. If you’re keen to get a copy for yourself, get in touch with Linzie through her website, where you can also see the full set of illustrated resolutions. Thanks for printing with us!

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Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid, illustration

Burnt Coffee Shadows

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Burnt Coffee Shadows caught our eye in The Newsagent recently. It’s got a great title, for one thing, and feels like an old school zine — no wonder, since the ongoing project from Paul Richards features fax machine prints and journal pages from the mid-’90s. It’s very cool to see these monochrome experiments gathered together in a whopping 64-page digital tabloid newspaper. We wanted to know a bit more about these ‘typescapes’ and Paul obliged us:

Too many late nights and lots of caffeine have led to the design of a typographic journal entitled ‘Burnt Coffee Shadows’. This black & white, 64-page newspaper includes material taken from note and sketchbooks that date as far back as 1996. Featuring visuals generated from thoughts, scribbles and experiments with hardware (old fax machines feature prominently) this book uses impression and expression to create dark, brooding typographic landscapes — typescapes.

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These typescapes mirror the cacophony of noise around us, the visual and audio onslaught of the modern environment – be it amongst the sprawling mish-mash of London, the complexity of Tokyo, or the towering grids of New York. The constant barrage of half-heard conversations, snippets of thoughts, emotions and overlapping communications combine in a visual flux conjured from and inspired by the milieu.

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An on-going experiment, this newspaper is the first ‘pause’ in a continuous process. Taking inspiration from the music scene, this edition will be followed by a series of companion ‘remix’ titles, released as alternate versions including collaborations with other artists. Just like the contemporary website, blog or software, the material is in a constant state of renewal and versioning, with this initial release being the catalyst for additional volumes.

 

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Filed under: art, case studies, digital tabloid

Face Me

9Poppy Skelley is an illustrator who recently finished her final year at Cambridge School of Art. She put together a digital tabloid newspaper called FACE ME, a fine collection of faces drawn over the course of her studies. Her lovely black-and-white drawings look great in newsprint, and we asked her to tell us a bit about her work:

FACE ME is a self-initiated project based on the topic of the face. I was researching into masks, faces and sculptures for a project that I was doing at university where I intended to create my own 3D busts out of clay. I had a lot of sketches and illustrations from museums and books that I produced throughout my project and I wanted to display them in some way.

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Printing through Newspaper Club was the ideal way to show my collection of illustrations and I found the online layout tool ARTHR really useful for playing around with page layout and page order.

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This paper also includes sketches made at home of my friends, self-portraits and faces drawn from my imagination. I am continuously drawing people and faces and it seems to be something that captures my interest and inspires me.

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The illustrations are produced using black and white gouache paints, pencils and pens.  I usually work with a lot of colour and texture in my illustrations, so it was a challenge to put together something that was black and white. It proved to be refreshing to work in a different way to what I am used to and I am very happy with the printed result.

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You can buy prints of Poppy’s drawings, including sketches from FACE ME, in her online shop. She keeps a very lovely illustration blog, too. Thanks for printing with us, Poppy!

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Filed under: art, ARTHR, case studies, illustration, Newspaper Stories

The Assumption

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Fionnuala Doran is a student at the Royal College Art who recently won the British Library’s Comics Unmasked competition. Her work engages with history through simple, striking illustration — like this wonderful drawing of Tippoo’s Tiger from a series of sketches from the V&A. The Assumption is a 16-page graphic novelette printed as a digital broadsheet. You can see the comic in its entirety in The Newsagent. Fionnuala tells us about her project:

The Assumption is the end result of my first year studying Visual Communication at the Royal College of Art, and was developed initially as a very loose adaptation of Julian Barnes’ short story Shipwreck.

The Assumption tells the story of the almost forgotten 1879 death of a ten year old boy during a riot in the small market town of Lurgan, Northern Ireland, the attempts to define the circumstances of his death by both his family and the police and the subsequent events in the town, the truth of which has never been determined.

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Thank you for printing with us, Fionnuala! You can find more comic newspapers under the ‘illustration’ tag in The Newsagent.

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Filed under: art, case studies, illustration, Newsagent

Winter Wonderland

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There’s still a few weeks of summer left but never mind — this lovely photo book from photographer Takeshi Suga has us looking forward to wintry days. Winter Wonderland is a 12-page tabloid newspaper of dream-like Japanese landscapes photographed at the beginning of 2013. ‘The scenery I photograph is somewhat whimsical and delicate,’ writes Suga, ‘blurring the boundaries between reality and fantasy.’ Limited to 300 copies, the newspaper has an introduction from Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley of similarly dreamy pop band Tennis. Suga writes about his project:

In Winter Wonderland I am exploring the idea of a wonderland in wintertime Japan. Despite our culture being increasingly westernized and Christmas becoming almost as important of an event to celebrate as New Year’s, “Winter Wonderland”, a winter-time song written in 1934 by Felix Bernard and Richard B. Smith, is relatively unknown in Japan. This reminded me of the fact that we imported the word ‘wonderland’ and while a number of imported words and cultural elements such as ‘Christmas’ have been assimilated into Japanese culture, ‘wonderland’ is a word many Japanese people have heard of but many people have never wondered what it is. This in turn raised the question whether or not a wonderland can be discovered in Japan.

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Through this sequence of imagery, I seek to convey that the idea of a winter wonderland, which was formed in the west, can also be applied to Japanese winter landscapes. Winter in some parts of Japan can be extremely harsh with heavy snowfall and fewer hours of sunlight than any other season but these images of landscapes show that becalmed beauty and wonder do exist in the moments of euphoric serenity the season also offers every now and then – that is where I believe Winter Wonderland resides.

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Winter Wonderland is currently available at bookshops in 7 cities in 6 different countries– Kobe, Tokyo, London, Barcelona, Brussels, Oslo and Amsterdam.

You can order a copy of Winter Wonderland online through Utakatado Publishing. See more of Takeshi Suga’s work on his website and keep up with upcoming projects on Instagram. Thank you for printing with us!

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Filed under: art, Newspaper Stories

Comic Sans for Cancer

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We’ve been very excited to help print a bad typeface for a good cause this week – Comic Sans for Cancer. Comic Sans for Cancer is an exhibition celebrating the 20th anniversary of the typeface we all love to hate, and putting the proceeds towards a really good cause – Cancer research. We’ve printed a limited run of newspapers as a program to accompany the event, which can be bought from exhibition if you hot foot it down there!

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Over 500 artists and designers got involved to create a brilliant series of posters to commemorate the event which are now being exhibited at The Proud Archivist.

Entry is totally free but donations are of course very welcome, with all funds raised going to Cancer Research UK. 

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You can read all about the exhibition and find out how to donate here.

All photographs here taken by David Craik Photography.

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Filed under: art, events, typography

Enjoy the Ride

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Enjoy the Ride is ‘a fanzine dedicated to all things automotive, scootering, motorbikes, design, art and photography’ created by graphic designer David Hardy. It’s a beautiful publication for sale in the Newsagent for £6.50. Here’s what David says about his newspaper:

Enjoy The Ride originally started out as a blog inspired by my love of wheels. The site features mainly vintage racing scooters & motorcycles as this is a real passion of mine. The fanzine had been in the pipeline for some time and being a graphic designer I had a real desire to translate some of the digital media into print. Newspaper stock suited the archive imagery & 35mm photography perfectly.  The concept behind the delivery was to create something mainly visual and not text heavy. There’s also something about the disposable quality of a newspaper that’s really attractive. Once the pages are filled with typography and photographs it immediately creates tension.

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The first issue was dedicated to notions of adventure, voyager, gadabout (One who roams or roves about, as in search of amusement or social activity). For many of us the pleasure of riding is a means of relaxation, escapism or in some cases a kind of prozac. We ride to experience new places, meet new friends and sometimes push ourselves beyond our comfort zones. As the road broadens, so does our emotional states of mind.

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Work is currently underway on a second issue. Thanks for printing with us, David!

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Filed under: art, case studies, Newsagent

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